Pre-Fall Wardrobe Planning: Linen meets wool (eventually)

Pre-Fall Wardrobe Planning: Linen meets wool (eventually)

Do you abide by any of those old “rules” like “no white after Labor Day”? I’m so indifferent to them I don’t think I’d ever even heard the prohibition against linen after Labor Day until I moved to Nashville. But my feeling is as long as the weather insists on hovering around the 100-degree mark, I insist on clinging to my linen wardrobe. Especially since I’ve been busily building it up these past several weeks! And the minute I get the brief opportunity to don the magical pairing of linen and wool, I will unapologetically do so.

We’re nowhere near that point yet, but I am distracting myself from the heat with fantasies of how I can put things together that look a tiny bit more like Fall (while still wearing like Summer) as well as what those first just-barely-sweater-weather pairings might look like. (See also, THIS.)

Pre-Fall Wardrobe Planning: Linen meets wool (eventually)

Recent makes pictured include my black linen tunic and my ivory smock vest, plus linen pants in toffee, stripe and pomelo. The third and fourth tops pictured are both by my longtime Internet friend Jo Abellera of Kkibo, both stunning, which I was extremely luck to get for my birthday at the end of last year when I visited her workspace in CA.

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PREVIOUSLY in Wardrobe Planning: Latter 2019 mood/palette

New Favorites: Bulky beauties

New Favorites: Bulky beauties

Like any human heart, mine often wants what it can’t have. Or shouldn’t have, anyway. In this case: any more bulky sweaters! Ohhhh the joy of a quickly knit sweater, the profound coziness of pulling one on when the weather is right. It’s soooo goooood. I know I’m supposed to be focusing on lighter, less warm sweaters to bring my closet in line with my climate, but I’m gazing longingly at these —

TOP: ふっくらケーブル模様のセーター by Yokota/Daruma features a simple cable at dramatic scale (Japanese only)

BOTTOM LEFT: Ramsay by Whitney Hayward is fisherman-level cables in light-as-air yarn

BOTTOM RIGHT: Cleburne Cardigan also by Whitney Hayward is a simple cardigan made special with striking colorwork

I mean, it’s not like they’re superbulky …

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Textured yokes

Introducing the new Town Bag + “garter stitch” bandanas!

Introducing the Fringe Supply Co. "garter stitch" bandanas!
Introducing the new Town Bag + "garter stitch" bandanas!

I’ve been a little awol this week because there’s a lot going on behind the scenes at Fringe Supply Co., with two delightful new goods for you today: First is the new Fringe Supply bandana pictured here — a 100% US-made cotton bandana (hard to come by!) with a “garter stitch” border hand-drawn by yours truly and available in two colors. For more on that, click through to the webshop.

And to be revealed at 9am CT is a new color of the Town Bag! So if you’re potentially into that, hold off on your bandana order till then. I’ll update this post once that’s live, but you might want to set an alarm to show up at the webshop right at that time. UPDATE: It’s FIG w/ waxed plum, and it’s a knockout!

Introducing the new Town Bag + "garter stitch" bandanas!

We’ve also got eggplant Bento Bags and charcoal Mamoru Mitts kits back in stock! And so much more, as always, at Fringe Supply Co.

Happy weekend, everyone — see you next week!

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That time I crocheted a hat

That time I crocheted a hat

I’m totally stunned that this worked. A) I’m not a frequent or experienced crocheter. B) I have never attempted to crochet something that had to fit. C) My gauge was totally different from the Wool and the Gang “Joanne” pattern I bought for this, so I had to wing it. But really the most amazing part isn’t that I crocheted a hat that fits — it’s that I made a hat that actually doesn’t look bad on me! Incredible.

This is the second of my three proposed Summer of Basics pieces, following my toffee Grace sweater. The third was meant to be a dress that I don’t yet have the fabric for. But since I’ve made three other dresses this summer (and pants!), I’m calling it a success.

That time I crocheted a hat

(Field Bag from Fringe Supply Co.)

PREVIOUSLY in FOs: Amazing “Grace” and the perfect pants

Elsewhere

Happy Friday, friends. I’ve got a nice varied stack of Elsewhere links for you below, but one tangential one first — from Grace Bonney as she closed Design Sponge after 15 years, a bit of advice I can simultaneously nod along with and continue to learn from, and I hope others will too: How to handle (and learn from) being called out. Please read and pass it along!

• Well said, Denise, and obviously about knitting as well: “Sewing has taught me that I’m in charge of the image I present to the world.”

Does anyone have a spare copy of this to sell me?

I love this crochet swimsuit

The fashion industry’s diversity problem

• Three new-to-me, WOC-owned, slow-fashion brands I’m loving: Emme (totally brilliant upcycling and more), Chelsea Bravo (hand-painted casual wear) and Proclaim (“inclusive nude” bras and bodysuits)

• Maybe this is the one to get me going: Quilted hexagon potholders (perhaps at coaster size?)

This sleeve swatch [heart eyes!] — and it takes me back to this ol’ gem

“Systematic overproduction just isn’t sustainable, no matter how you spin it.”

This doll outfit in my size, please (Which takes me back to these beauties!)

Next-level yoke (click the little right arrow on the first image)

Stunning shibori

• And wowwwwww

IN SHOP NEWS: We’ve got the brand-new MDK Field Guide No. 12: Big Joy! And so much more …

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PREVIOUSLY: Elsewhere

New Favorites: Textured yokes

New Favorites: Textured yokes

I’m still hosting an internal debate about my fall sweater. Now, in addition to the allover texture options, I’m weighing textured yoke possibilities. These are just a few of the contenders, along with previously mentioned Anker’s Sweater and Eldingar

TOP: Tarn by Claire Walls

MIDDLE LEFT: Astragal by Ainur Berkimbayeva

MIDDLE RIGHT: Ocean by Christina Danaee

BOTTOM: Mio by Paula Pereira

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites:

The Details: Sleeve cap short rows

How to knit sleeve-cap short rows

There’s a trick I have wanted to try for as long as I’ve known the term “short rows” but hadn’t until my Grace pullover — for reasons unknown. What finally prompted me to try it was that I was knitting this sweater out of chunky yarn and in pretty fitted proportions, the combination of which made the urge more pressing. What am I talking about? Making more room for my shoulders.

If you’ve been reading this blog for long, you know that (even before discovering the freedom of experimentation that comes with top-down sweater knitting) I learned to favor raglan sweaters at a young age because my shoulders are so broad that fitting into set-in-sleeve clothes is a challenge — if the sleeve cap seams hit at the tips of my shoulders where they belong, the garment will be too big for me overall, and vice versa. Raglans solve this in that there’s no sleeve seam to sit uncomfortably in the wrong place, but it can still be the case — especially on a snug pullover — that there’s not quite enough fabric to get over my big shoulders. It has always seemed to me that this should be addressable with short rows, and I’m glad I finally gave it a go!

This was an especially easy case for them, too, since the gauge of this sweater meant I could create extra fabric in only a couple of short-row turns. I’ve left my pink waste yarn in place for the pic up top so you can kind of see, but here’s all I did:

1) After separating my yoke into the sleeves and body and knitting a few inches of the body, as I like to do, I put my sleeve stitches back on my needles. (That’s the upper pink strand of waste yarn.) I’ve knitted my sleeves flat, as usual — picking up underarm stitches starting at the midpoint of the underarm (aka side seam), knitting across the sleeve stitches, and picking up the last few underarm stitches back to the midpoint — but this process would be the same if you were knitting in the round.

2) I then purled back across the WS of these stitches, stopping one stitch before the end of the row, and did a YO-and-turn. (You could wrap-and-turn, or whatever your favorite short-row method is.) Then knitted back to 1 st before the end of this third row, YO and turn. That’s one pair of turns.

3) For my second pair of turns, I placed them in line with my front and back raglan “seams.”

4) And then I worked my way back across the stitches one last time, closing up the YOs as I encountered them, to the end of the row. (That’s the lower strand of pink waste yarn.)

This amounted to a wedge of six extra rows of knitting at the sleeve cap before I continued downward with the full set of sleeve stitches as normal, giving me an extra 1″ of fabric to help accommodate my shoulders before worrying about my arms. For a finer gauge sweater, I would want to do the equivalent number of rows at whatever row gauge to create the same amount of extra fabric, and would distribute those turns within the underarm stitches.

This will factor into every top-down raglan I do from now on, stitch pattern permitting!

For all other details on this sweater, see the original FO post.

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PREVIOUSLY in The Details: How to sew a kangaroo pocket