Elsewhere

Yarny links for your clicking pleasure

Happy Friday and Elsewhere day — I’ve got a little light but delightful clicking around for you:

– Great post about how to mend knits

– plus beautiful darning sampler

Heart-melting (top right)

– I’m excited to watch the #leighsidemittskal2017 (details here) but I especially love finding out about this Generic Norwegian Mitten Chart via @resurrectionfern (who is knitting mittens inspired by Karen Barbé! So many of my favorite ladies tangled up in there.)

– Also wishing I could fit in the #fancykal, a sweater that’s been on my list for ages

– And just wow (top left)

Have a magnificent weekend, everyone!

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Elsewhere

Elsewhere: Yarny links for your clicking pleasure

Hey, guess what — we’ve all survived another holiday pre-season! Now for the fun part: eating. I’m keeping Elsewhere on the lighter side this week, but here are some golden nuggets to keep you entertained if and when you need it—

– That time the Mason-Dixon ladies’ spoof country music recording (pictured top left) got mistaken for a historical document

– Want to paper your walls in knitted fabric? (I might if they weren’t all so terrifyingly enormous! DG disagrees with me.) (bottom right) See also: Alpaca wallpaper

– More on the Prada knitted fabric fascination (see prev) here and here (especially love the conversation on that one) and here

– Tackling the problem of fashion industry waste (via) — I’m hoping to listen to this on my current road trip

– The new National Mill Inventory site makes my heart happy

– This just in: Julie Hoover is not perfect (bottom left)

7 reasons why you should knit your own basics

– @notaprimarycolor’s sketchbook planning for #sewmystyle (top right) has me itching to update my queue-book

This sweater

– and on the unrelated subject of our riven nation, make sure you watch the Sam Bee and Glenn Beck interview.

Whatever holiday or ritual you may be observing this weekend, I hope it’s a good one. Happy everything, everyone— <blowing kiss emoji>

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Elsewhere

Elsewhere: Yarny links for your clicking pleasure

Don’t be alarmed! It’s not Friday already, but I have something special planned for this Friday and recalled the days when I used to do Elsewhere on Wednesdays — you know, that day of the week where you totally don’t feel like working and would rather wander aimlessly around the internet. I’m here for you:

Squam pre-registration is open, and I’m one of the instructors! (photo top left)

I love every word of this (bottom right)

Heaven

– In case there’s anyone who hasn’t heard, there are handknit scarves on the new Gilmore Girls! Kelbourne Woolens first heard about it from the designers, who had used Knightsbridge for Dots & Dashes (worn by Rory) and Road to China Light for Eponymuff (worn by Paris). Mason-Dixon has an interview with the designers — with lots of BTS and on-set details. (top right)

– I love the idea of spending Black Friday sewing instead of shopping. (thx, Karen)

– Sweet embroidered wooden bowls tutorial (bottom left)

– Painful reminder that there are still fast-fashion sweatshops in the US (thx, Angela)

– and don’t miss Clara Parkes on pilling

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Elsewhere + Shop Talk

Elsewhere + Shop Talk

First, a little bit of shop talk:

1) There’s a small batch of the Porter Bin in the shop right now (more next week), and you can also find it today in person at a few of our stores: Purl Soho, Fibre Space, The Yarnery, Tolt Yarn and Wool and (arriving soon) Fancy Tiger Crafts.

2) The Limited Edition hair-on-hide version of our stitch marker pouch is also in the shop this morning — while they last!

3) In case you missed it yesterday, Wish List!

And now, Elsewhere:

Lovely piece on the Verb blog about boro, sashiko and our Stowe Kit (available here)

A video not to be missed (thx, Anna!)

Craft as solace

This sweater

A history of knitting in 46 minutes

Now THAT’s a yarn bomb

Negative-waste fashion? (thanks to multiple tippers!)

– “In one year, this wall clock will make a two metre-long scarf …” (bottom right)

– Have you heard about the Pussyhat Project? (top right)

– I love the concept of the FibershedKAL (top left)

– and I also love MDK’s new Knitstrips feature — patterns in graphic novel form (bottom left)

Have a fantastic weekend, everyone — thank you for everything this week!

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Elsewhere: The great swatch experiment

Elsewhere: The great swatch experiment

This week shook me up, friends — I’m having a whole lot of trouble wrapping my brain around what’s happening in this country right now. Under other circumstances, today I’d have a nice juicy pile of links for you, but my focus has been, uh, elsewhere. That said, though, I do have one bit of brilliance for you to explore. My friends over at Kelbourne Woolens have been doing something fascinating: The Great Swatch Experiment. It all started with a tweet, which led to a crazy idea:

What if we did an experiment? We could write up a quick “pattern” for a 4″ square stockinette stitch swatch, with a nice little garter border. Tell people what needle size to use, of course, but not tell them the gauge. We could send a skein of each of our yarns out to volunteer knitters to knit the swatches and mail them back to us. (They would keep the rest of the skein, of course). If we had three or four different swatches from three or four different knitters, all using the needle size we recommended, how different would the swatches be?

Which led to a whole lot of swatches (75 of them!) and a whoooole lot of number-crunching. Each yarn’s swatch instructions were based on a specific pattern — so the swatch dimensions could then be compared to the garment dimensions — and the results are dramatic. Take the Canopy Worsted example — and remember each knitter just cast on the designated number of stitches using the suggested needle size. If the knitter of the loosest swatch had cast on with the suggested needle and knitted and blocked the sweater, it would be 3.5″ too large. If the knitter of the tightest swatch did that, hers would be 8.5″ too small! Eight. And a half. Inches. But in addition to a lot of jaw-dropping case studies, the whole thing has afforded a chance to talk about all sorts of knitting and swatching issues and concerns. You can (and should!) check out the whole series on their blog. (Scroll to the bottom for the start.)

I hope we can all find some peace and understanding in the coming days. Please be kind to yourself and your neighbors this weekend and always—

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Photos by Linette Kilenski/Kelbourne Woolens, used with permission

Elsewhere: Slow Fashion October edition 3

Elsewhere: Slow Fashion October edition 3

So I have some terrific links for you guys this week, but what I also would really like to do is hear from YOU! There’s been so much shared all over the web throughout Slow Fashion October — in comments on the posts here and on the @slowfashionoctober highlights at IG, on blogs all over, and of course the entirety of the #slowfashionoctober feed. What have been your favorite posts and moments and ideas so far? Please link to your favorites in the comments below!

– I’ve read this post three times it’s so good: “This is what I’ll carry with me when I wear my sweater in the wide world. Secret, humming power.” (photo above, left)

– Felicia Semple on trying to define Slow Fashion from the consumers’ point of view: “All we can do is our best; to be informed and make choices that make the most sense on any given day. We need to accept that often we will make those choices in uncertainty, but strive to take responsibility for them regardless.”

– “I want to talk about what I sometimes feel is the elephant in the room when it comes to Slow Fashion. Not the longevity of the garments but the longevity of Slow Fashion as a movement.”

– “Apparently I paid a lot for marketing

– “Every day I do just one thing before bed — press a seam, sew a block, mend. I make tiny progress and I end my day with what I love.”

– “To others it’s just a white shirt but to me it represents what can be achieved in small steps and finding focus in a chaotic season.”

– “A thing I know is that making for my favorite people is a way to take care of them.”

– “Sewing has given me a lot: a mental capacity for new skills … an appreciation of quality work … and a moral sense of responsibility for all people the world over who make clothes — because some of us do it in our homes for ourselves and some of us do it in unsafe factories for other people. Sewing taught me to care about that as more than just an idle worry.” (photo above, right)

– “Hoard your clothes, kids!!!

– “Even if you only make one garment in one year, that’s something. And even if you knit one scarf, that’s something too. No shame if you cannot make your entire wardrobe; you still have a place in slow fashion.”

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Hey, if you’re in Middle Tennessee, I hope we’ll see you at Fiber in the ‘Boro tomorrow. And I hope you have a marvelous weekend no matter where you are!

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Elsewhere: Slow Fashion October edition 2

Elsewhere: Slotober edition 2

We’ve still got the weekend to talk about the Long-Worn theme for Slow Fashion October this week, which is a good thing because I feel like I’ve barely scratched the surface! Hopefully everyone saw the two related posts here this week — 21st-century thrifting and My week in the Craftlands — and both have loads of great comments on them at this point, so click back and take a look at those, as well as the contributions I’ve featured on @slowfashionoctober so far this week, and my post about how to wear worn clothes without looking shabby.

More highlights from the great discussion—

– So many amazing heirlooms and hand-me-downs have been shared on the #slowfashionoctober feed throughout the week. I want to mention that the aran sweater Jess’s grandmother knitted is from a 1967 Bernat pattern book called The Bernat Book of Irish Knits and has made two separate appearances on this blog – here (top right in the bottom photo grouping) and here (no. 5). It’s always amazing how many people say “I had that book” or “I had that sweater.” I have the sense it was the Boxy of its time! And it’s fun to imagine a single pattern being such a huge hit in a pre-Ravelry world.

– I’ve been falling down on the job with the My First Sweater series, so I especially loved Dianna’s blog post about hers, in the Long-Worn context.

– “It’s amazing to put on a piece of clothing that was made decades ago, worn by a woman I love and respect so much, and passed on to me.”

– “My involvement with slow fashion is organic to the way I’m trying to live my life – in a way that reflects my values and ethics and is mindful.  It is also a way to assert individuality in an increasingly homogenized world.” (Don’t miss @proper_tension on IG — I love her style!)

– “I’m not sure how precisely I define ‘slow fashion,’ but for me a big part of it is about being thoughtful — thinking through what I need, being willing to wait for it (either because of the time it takes to make it or the time it takes to save for it), and then committing to keep it for a long time.

– “Last night I started Kate Fletcher’s new book Craft of Use, and I’m excited, amazed, emboldened, and more. …” — omg I’ve lost track of who posted this! Please raise your hand if it was you!

– “However, don’t wash your clothes unless they need it.”

TOPIC FOR THE WEEKEND:

– “I often hang on to quality pieces that still fit me well once I get tired of them. More often than not, I’ve found the item gets resurrected after a break in the back of the closet and becomes an oft-worn favourite all over again. … I’ve been thankful so many times that I didn’t pitch great clothes in a fit of closet purging.”

One thing I’ve been thinking a lot about and would love to discuss is the question of whether SMALL matters. This was actually one of my themes last year, and I’ve said already I feel a bit repentant for having suggested — as is so often done — that a closet clean-out is an important starting point. I’ve long felt that, especially with anything that was potentially sweatshop goods, the best way to honor that sewers work is to not banish it but to put it to use. The more I think about it, and the more I know about what happens to donated clothes, the more I see the capsule concept conflated with slow fashion (there are lots of people making fast-fashion capsule wardrobes — they may overlap, but they’re not the same thing), the more I wonder about this. There’s no question that simply buying less — participating less in the fast-fashion marketplace — is a good thing. But what about our obligation to those clothes we already own? What if — IDEALISTIC RHETORICAL SCENARIO ALERT — all you buy is small-batch, locally woven, organically-grown fiber clothes made by lovely people whose small business you’re supporting with your purchase? What if — EXTREME EXAMPLE TO PROVE A POINT —  you’re stylist-designer Rachel Zoe out buying up and preserving decades of significant vintage garments and preserving them in your immense closets, thereby honoring them and keeping them from the landfill. What I’m saying is buying less is critical, absolutely, and what we buy is critical, but a smaller wardrobe isn’t automatically a more virtuous one, is it? Who was it that made the great point on IG about having more clothes to choose from meant each garment got worn less often and lasted longer. Fair point? Discuss!

OTHER NOTABLES:

– Knitting for victory (thx, Kelbournes)

– If you loved Jane Richmond’s sweater from the Cowichan Knitalong last year, it’s now a pattern!

Thanks for all the incredible input this week, everyone — have a fantastic weekend!

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The images up top coincide with links above or posts I’ve regrammed this week; click through for the originals — top lefttop rightmiddle leftmiddle rightbottom leftbottom right.

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