New Favorites: Chevron hats

New Favorites: Chevron hats

I’ve heard from so many of you that you’d love to knit the Channel cardigan but aren’t sure about taking on the scale of the project. And then there’s me (and others), having worked that lovely stitch pattern and missing it. So for all of us, here are some recent hat patterns with differently enticing chevron stitches to entertain us:

TOP: Braddock by Christina Danaee

MIDDLE: Quill by Andrea Mowry (in the current issue of Taproot)

BOTTOM: Prism by Emily Greene

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Texture by the yard

New Favorites: Texture by the yard

New Favorites: Texture by the yard

Working on my Channel cardigan over the last several weeks has deepened my appreciation for textured fabric created through knits and purls rather than cables or lace stitches. There’s something so meditative and melodious about knitting those stitches and watching the fabric build, which has me craving more of that. And has sent me back to my favorites in search of scarf patterns that not only allow you to just sit there and create texture, stitch by stitch, but are the ultimate showcase for the finished yardage, as it were:

TOP: Binary by Michele Wang features large, alternating blocks of texture

BOTTOM LEFT: Facade by Shellie Anderson is almost certainly not just knits and purls — wrapped stitches, maybe? — but look at that beautiful texture-blocking and how a simple rectangle shows off the fabric

BOTTOM RIGHT: Broken Garter Scarf from Purl Soho employs one of the simplest of sequence knitting combinations to great effect (free pattern)

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Spring shawls

New Favorites: Spring shawls

New Favorites: Spring shawls

March! That time of the year when we all start to ditch our coats and knitters replace them with shawls instead of jackets—

TOP: With Ease by Sylvia McFadden looks to me like it’s knitted from the left edge to the right tip, which is as tempting as that gorgeous stitch pattern

MIDDLE LEFT: Black River Blanket Shawl by Sam Lamb is a basic top-down triangle shawl with the visual punch of a trio of stripes

MIDDLE RIGHT: Flindra by Libby Jonson is an elongated triangle with intriguing construction plus slip-stitch colorwork

BOTTOM: Goderich Blanket by Tara-Lynn Morrison is a small rectangle worn as a wrap — love that “diagonal rib” stitch (free pattern)

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Bohème big and small

New Favorites: Bohème big and small

New Favorites: Bohème big and small

I am fairly obsessed with the notion of knitting another colorwork-yoke sweater (following my St. Brendan), and soon. There are tons of contenders (and another on the horizon apparently — UPDATE, that came out today: Skógafjall), but last week I was going through my Ravelry favorites and the one that made my heart race the fastest is a kids’ pattern called Bohème for Kids by Randi Hjelm Debes. I had it in my head that I was going to do another “in my size, please” post, but just a couple of days later the adult version, predictably called Bohème Sweater, magically appeared! I absolutely love the simple geometry of the motif and the way in which the two colors transition across it. So I’m pondering colors for the time being …

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Vodka on the Rocks

New Favorites: Vodka on the Rocks

New Favorites: Vodka on the Rocks

No matter how badly I need simple, plain pullovers, I can’t stop adding elaborately textured cardigans to my knitting wish list. Just when I thought I was getting a handle on my addiction, along comes Thea Colman with this Vodka on the Rocks pattern (part of The Vodka Collection of cardigans, all of them good) and suddenly I’m mentally rearranging my list again. It’s one of those designs that manages to strike a balance between intriguing and wearable: Most of the fabric (in particular the sleeves) is a vertical textured stripe that avoids adding bulk, with a single cable column running up each front and a large, intricate cable panel contained to the back. But it all hangs together as a design, looking both gorgeous and fun to knit. Dammit.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Baedecker

New Favorites: Baedecker

New Favorites: Baedecker

I have yet to knit a scarf, and every once in awhile I see a scarf that makes me think, hm, that might be the one. I’m still not over Linda, but now there’s Baedecker by Marina Skua (from Quince and Co’s Scarves Etc 6 collection) putting up an argument that perhaps it should be my first. I’m entranced by those giant cabled diamonds — so simple, but so striking. If I get to do some long-distance traveling this spring, this might be a good companion, since it would be occupying but slow going.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Purl’s most brilliant blanket

New Favorites: Purl’s most brilliant blanket

New Favorites: Purl Soho's most brilliant blanket

Here I am adding to my list of blankets I’d love to nap under but don’t have the patience to knit! But being a sucker for clever construction, I can’t let this one go unremarked: Purl Soho’s new Learn-to-Love-Steeks Blanket (free pattern). I know, you’re thinking “Did she just say ‘clever construction’ in a post about a blanket?” I did. With refined facings and edgings, it’s a simple single-stripe stockinette blanket, but it’s worked in the round — in a big tube, in other words — and then cut open. The implications and levels of brilliance of that combination are explained far better by Laura in her intro to the pattern than I can paraphrase, so you should really just go read the whole thing.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Unexpected cables