New Favorites: Kanoko

New Favorites: Kanoko

On the morning of our first full day at Squam a few weeks back, my friend and cabin mate Mary Jane Mucklestone popped out of her room, declared that she was ready to go, and proceeded to make pretty much every single person at the retreat fall in love with her. In her effortlessly MJ way, she was wearing a sort of prim, navy, polka-dotted shirtdress with her Kanoko Socks and a pair of black Doc Martens boots, and nobody has ever looked cooler tromping around the woods of New Hampshire. (I couldn’t take a photo that did the outfit justice.) This adorable spotted socks pattern of hers had been among my favorites of the many stunning projects in the third issue of Making, the Dots issue, from the moment it arrived, but that was the day I went from admiring them to coveting them, and I may have to knit them, even if I’ll never be as cool as MJM.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Summer sweaters

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New Favorites: Summer sweaters

New Favorites: Summer sweaters

This might be a bit whiplashy — we were just talking about ski sweaters two days ago — but happy summer! Have you thought about knitting a little summer sweater? Lots of good patterns lately, but these especially have caught my eye:

TOP: 217s-06 from Pierrot Yarns is garter simplicity incarnate. I can’t find the pattern where they told me to look, but it seems to be just four squares (or two squares and two tubes, if you prefer) UPDATE: It’s been added to Ravelry since last I checked!

MIDDLE LEFT: Auger by Pam Allen is more garter goodness, this time in tank form (See also: Pam Allen’s linen tanks)

MIDDLE RIGHT: Monterey Tee by Kate Gagnon Osborn is a dressier option, with lace as ventilation

BOTTOM: Fog Cutter by Thea Colman is more of a San Francisco or rocky-coast-of-Maine sort of summer sweater

See also previous summer sweater pattern roundups here and here.

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QUICK SHOP NOTE: We’re still waiting for more of the full-size Lykke interchangeable sets, but the good news is the short-tip sets are here! (A set of 9 pairs of 3.5″ tips for making 16-24″ needles.)

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Colorwork plus

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New Favorites: Colorwork plus

New Favorites: Colorwork plus

A variety of conversations and previews and proximity to experts lately has me itching to get some colorwork into my knittin queue, and I’m particularly smitten with these two patterns with just a little spot of something extra:

TOP: Hoopla by Dianna Walla (from the powerhouse new issue of Pom Pom) is a characteristically appealing 2-color job but with the subtle flair of a Latvian braid at the transition from ribbing to stockinette.

BOTTOM: Inlet Scarf by Inese Sang is mosaic, for starters (which I’m still dying to try), but I also really love the simple black border setting the mosaic section apart from the staggered rib texture along both ends — really lovely combination of elements

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Whelk

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New Favorites: Whelk

New Favorites: Whelk

I keep telling myself I really need to make more things with sleeves (both sewn and knitted) but for the past few years, I’ve been dying to knit a sweater vest. Not a waistcoat — I’ve done that. A few times. — but a pullover vest. There’s an idea I’ve had in my mind a long time, and there’s Grille, and then Bue, and now there’s this fantastic Martin Storey pattern, Whelk. I’m showing you the kids’ version here because this photo is so darling, but it’s written for children through adult sizes, and is perfectly unisex. There’s something funny about essentially painting a bullseye on your own chest, but I just love it.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Crocheted slippers

New Favorites: Crocheted slippers

New Favorites: Crocheted slippers

Every single summer I say I want to do two things: crochet something, and make some socks or slippers. For some reason, both seem like perfect little summer projects, and yet I never do either. So I lit up when I saw that Churchmouse and Tolt had both released crocheted slipper patterns for their area LYS tour! AND I recently had to say goodbye to my most beloved slippers and am thus quickly wearing holes in my Simple House Slippers, so it’s a genuine need. It’s fate, I tell you.

TOP: Churchmouse’s Moroccan Babouche Slippers are the crocheted version of their Turkish Bed Socks (the first sock/slipper pattern I ever downloaded)

BOTTOM: Tolt’s Harvold slippers by Karen Crittenden have a 1970s+moccasin vibe I love, and bulky gauge no less!

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Banded ribs

New Favorites: Banded ribs

New Favorites: Banded ribs

I don’t know if this interrupted-ribbing stitch pattern has a commonly accepted name (if it does, fill me in! and is it ribbing or brioche?) but I fell in love with it upon first seeing Helga Isager’s Pine/Marie Cardigan (top photo) from a few years ago, and now again upon encountering Anker’s Sweater (“My Size”) (bottom photo) by PetiteKnitDK. Both are seamless, circular-yoke sweaters — a perfect marriage of construction and stitch pattern. PKDK’s pullover has it contained to the yoke, and I’m a sucker for a yoke sweater that’s done with texture rather than colorwork. But there’s also something I find entrancing about its allover puckered glory on Isager’s cardigan. I could look at that photo all day long.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Bits to borrow

New Favorites: Bits to borrow

New Favorites: Bits to borrow

You know that feeling when you see a stitch pattern and your fingers start twitching with the urge to knit it? But sometimes it’s on a garment or accessory that doesn’t quite suit you. So what’s a knitter to do?

TOP: Salt by Sylvia McFadden
I’m obsessed with stitch patterns like this one — especially this one — but not much of a shawl wearer (or knitter), so here I am pondering borrowing it for a little hat or somesuch.

BOTTOM: Split Stone by Clare Mountain
I really love what’s happening on the lower part of this sweater — I’m just not personally a fan of drop-shoulder sweaters. So I can’t help daydreaming about knitting this one from hem to underarm and then just changing what happens from there up.

(In both cases, obviously, I would buy the pattern!)

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Marmor