New Favorites: Angelina

New Favorites: Angelina Pullover pattern by Mary Anne Benedetto

The Fall issue of Interweave Knits looks like a good one overall, but I’m especially taken with this Angelina Pullover, designed by Mary Anne Benedetto. I love a good yoke with cables in place of colorwork, and these gradually widening wishbones are particularly appealing. Plus I’m thrilled they opted the knit the sample in black. (I believe in black cables.) I’m a little bit conflicted about the shirttail hem — it really shouldn’t work on a yoke sweater, and feels a little trendy, but it’s so beautifully executed I can’t argue with it. The shaping is perfection, and I can’t get enough of the way that I-cord edge hangs. It doesn’t hurt that it happens to be styled with black-and-white gingham, which has been a fixation of mine for months now. So I’d like this exact combo, please.

[EDIT: Apparently this color of Cumbria is Dodd Wood, an extremely dark brown. I forgot there’s no black in that yarn!]

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Threipmuir

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New Favorites: Threipmuir

New Favorites: Threipmuir

I KNOW! Another dark sweater with colorwork yoke (love and have), but independent of that, I’m a bit swoony over Ysolda Teague’s new pullover pattern, Threipmuir. Ysolda’s sort of bending a genre here, with a lopapeysa-inspired sweater knitted at fingering gauge, which leaves room for finer, more intricate patterning in the colorwork section. The mix of geometric and organic motifs is really pleasing to me in this instance, but what I love best about it is how the colorwork literally feathers out onto the solid ground, creating a nice soft transition between the two. Really lovely.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: The perfect leftovers hat

New Favorites: The perfect leftovers hat

New Favorites: The perfect leftovers hat

Every single time I buy yarn for a sweater, I buy a little more than I think I might need plus one more skein — out of extreme caution heightened by my compact-row-gauge affliction — and every time I think, “If there’s enough left over, I’ll knit a matching hat.” I’m apparently wild about the idea of a matching hat. And yet, thus far, I have never once done that. Which means I have a lot of leftovers, which is why you’re always hearing me speculate about a leftovers blanket or even a leftovers sweater. But the fact is, I do really love the idea of using them to make myself an array of very plain but perfectly coordinated hats — hats that hopefully meet my exacting requirements for a hat, since I don’t have a super hat-friendly head and won’t wear one if it isn’t just right. Enter Whitney Hayward’s Holcomb Hat, an ultra-basic top-down hat pattern written to work for any gauge and intended size. She describes it as ideal for using up handspun (unpredictable gauge) and those mysterious no-longer-labeled stash yarns we all have rolling around, but I love this specifically for project leftovers because you’ve already established your gauge, thereby negating the need to commit any of your yarn to a swatch while simultaneously increasing the likelihood of nailing the fit.

The thing about a top-down hat is it’s the same as a top-down sweater: Trying it on as you go is all well and good, but you need to know how blocking will affect the finished fabric. As long as you remember to count, not measure, you should be good. And a fold-up brim always gives you wiggle room on the length.

I’m hereby swearing to do this when I’m done with my current sweater, leftover yardage permitting.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Goose Eye

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New Favorites: Goose Eye

New Favorites: Goose Eye

Holy moly. A new book arrived from Isager (of The Artisan fame, etc) for the shop yesterday and it is a stunner — packed full of gorgeous patterns I’d love to knit — but the one that immediately affected my heart rate and breathing is this big colorwork pullover called Goose Eye. The book is called ALJ: Ase Lund Jensen — a Danish knitwear desiger, and it’s a tribute to and history of the founder of the company we know as Isager. Goose Eye is one of the patterns that was adapted from an original ALJ design by Marianne Isager. It’s a drop-dead gorgeous motif, and I love the detail of what happens at the raglans and along the underarm (seen in that last image), and while I’d go not-so-oversize with it, I think this might really truly be the one that finally gets me to commit to an allover colorwork sweater. (I know I’ve said that before, but JUST LOOK AT IT.) I can’t cast on anytime soon, so I have time to mull: ivory and grey, grey and black, black and navy, ivory and black, ivory and camel …?

You can see more of the patterns and order a copy of ALJ at Fringe Supply Co. (Or if you’re quick and on Instagram, you can see a full flip-through in my Story this morning at @fringesupplyco.)

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Veronika

New Favorites: Veronika

New Favorites: Veronika

Last month, Shannon Cook posted a pic on Instagram that made my eyes pop out of my head. It’s basically the shawl-collared-blanket-with-arm-slits of my dreams, and the finished pattern, Veronika, went live yesterday. I’m imagining myself curled up in the corner of the couch someday, wrapped in one of these — oblivious to the godforsaken air vent behind the couch, thanks to the voluminous shawl collar — while knitting another one.

New Favorites: Veronika

PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Quick mitts

New Favorites: Quick mitts

New Favorites: Quick mitts

Ever since typing that bit about my single skein of Crooked Fence Farm yarn being destined to become a pair of fingerless mitts, I haven’t been able to stop thinking about which mitts. It’s a humbly gorgeous yarn — the yarn next door who doesn’t know how pretty she is — and I want it to be something simple but not overly plain, quick to knit but not boring. I’m in love with Tante Ehm’s Rime mitts (lower photo), with their simple repeat of slipped knits against reverse stockinette, but think the better choice for this yarn might be Melissa Schaschwary’s Timber Bay Mitts (upper photo) with their alternating waves of k1/p1 textures. I’ll have to keep that in mind as my next little traveling project.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Kanoko

 

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New Favorites: Kanoko

New Favorites: Kanoko

On the morning of our first full day at Squam a few weeks back, my friend and cabin mate Mary Jane Mucklestone popped out of her room, declared that she was ready to go, and proceeded to make pretty much every single person at the retreat fall in love with her. In her effortlessly MJ way, she was wearing a sort of prim, navy, polka-dotted shirtdress with her Kanoko Socks and a pair of black Doc Martens boots, and nobody has ever looked cooler tromping around the woods of New Hampshire. (I couldn’t take a photo that did the outfit justice.) This adorable spotted socks pattern of hers had been among my favorites of the many stunning projects in the third issue of Making, the Dots issue, from the moment it arrived, but that was the day I went from admiring them to coveting them, and I may have to knit them, even if I’ll never be as cool as MJM.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Summer sweaters

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