New Favorites: Huck

New Favorites: Huck

As you likely know, the Brooklyn Tweed Fall ’17 collection hit the airwaves yesterday, and there are several nice garments in there that could make their way into my queue someday. But the standout — the design that made me leap out of my chair a little — is Norah Gaughan’s hat pattern, Huck. I’ve been missing that raspberry/blackberry/trinity stitch from my fisherman sweater and planning to knit a funny little hat pattern from the same 1967 booklet (which partially inspired my teaching pattern, Debutant) that uses the same stitch. But Norah has hit this one well out of the park. The way the cables nestle into the raspberries is flat-out stunning, and looks like it would be so fun to knit … that I already printed the pattern!* I look at so many hat patterns every week of my life, and this one was such a jolt of originality. I was about to say now I can’t decide between this one and the vintage one, but they’re hats! No need to choose.

*I feel compelled to note here, by way of a little PSA, that if you’re printing this (or any) pattern, please only print the pages you need! This one is hilariously 11 pages long, but you actually only need a few of them.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Massaman set

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New Favorites: Massaman set

New Favorites: Massaman set

One of the first things I ever favorited at Ravelry, when I first learned to knit, is this “Charcoal set” by a knitter who goes by knittimo — a simple charcoal pullover and a little cowl knitted in the same yarn. I didn’t necessarily love the particulars of the cowl, but I loved the idea of a removable turtleneck, basically. I remember how charmed I was when I ran into it. (We were still living in the always-blustery Bay Area then, where protecting your neck is a daily must, year-round. Being able to remove the cowl once inside was immensely appealing.) In the past couple of weeks, I’ve seen two different patterns released for a sweater with matching cowl, which brought that old favorite to mind. The one I an enamored with is Massaman by Elizabeth Smith, a sleeveless take on the same thought. You know I love a sleeveless turtleneck, but I also adore this little tee without its cowl. Having the cowl option, though, makes an already great layering piece that much more fun to play with. And it would be so fun and quick to knit …

Uh oh. I think I hear my resolve cracking.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Colorwork for minimalists

New Favorites: Colorwork for minimalists

New Favorites: Colorwork for minimalists

In addition to the fact that the whole color palette for this photo shoot is KILLING ME (her hair, that wall, that foliage …), I am swooning hard over these two new patterns by Whitney Hayward that use the tiniest bit of colorwork to such major effect. In both cases, it’s just a few well-placed rows of 1×1 stranding, and while I obviously love the neutrals here, you can imagine how totally different the effect would be if knitted in three colors instead of three nons. The shawl is Ural and the little transitional-season sweater is Fukuro. Gorgeous on every level.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites:  from Rowan 62

New Favorites: from Rowan 62

New Favorites: from Rowan 62

The big fall Rowan collection is out, Rowan 62, and if you’re looking for a cable sweater pattern, they’ve got about a dozen for you to choose from, all of them good. But these are my favorites from the issue:

TOP: Cowlam by Lisa Richardson makes me yearn for turtleneck weather!

BOTTOM LEFT: Gransmoor also by Lisa Richardson is a great, bold stranded pullover, love that stripe at chest level

BOTTOM RIGHT: Eastbury by Emma Wright is a cute little circular-yoke stockinette sweater with just a few stripes around the cuffs for interest

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Angelina

 

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New Favorites: Angelina

New Favorites: Angelina Pullover pattern by Mary Anne Benedetto

The Fall issue of Interweave Knits looks like a good one overall, but I’m especially taken with this Angelina Pullover, designed by Mary Anne Benedetto. I love a good yoke with cables in place of colorwork, and these gradually widening wishbones are particularly appealing. Plus I’m thrilled they opted the knit the sample in black. (I believe in black cables.) I’m a little bit conflicted about the shirttail hem — it really shouldn’t work on a yoke sweater, and feels a little trendy, but it’s so beautifully executed I can’t argue with it. The shaping is perfection, and I can’t get enough of the way that I-cord edge hangs. It doesn’t hurt that it happens to be styled with black-and-white gingham, which has been a fixation of mine for months now. So I’d like this exact combo, please.

[EDIT: Apparently this color of Cumbria is Dodd Wood, an extremely dark brown. I forgot there’s no black in that yarn!]

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Threipmuir

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New Favorites: Threipmuir

New Favorites: Threipmuir

I KNOW! Another dark sweater with colorwork yoke (love and have), but independent of that, I’m a bit swoony over Ysolda Teague’s new pullover pattern, Threipmuir. Ysolda’s sort of bending a genre here, with a lopapeysa-inspired sweater knitted at fingering gauge, which leaves room for finer, more intricate patterning in the colorwork section. The mix of geometric and organic motifs is really pleasing to me in this instance, but what I love best about it is how the colorwork literally feathers out onto the solid ground, creating a nice soft transition between the two. Really lovely.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: The perfect leftovers hat

New Favorites: The perfect leftovers hat

New Favorites: The perfect leftovers hat

Every single time I buy yarn for a sweater, I buy a little more than I think I might need plus one more skein — out of extreme caution heightened by my compact-row-gauge affliction — and every time I think, “If there’s enough left over, I’ll knit a matching hat.” I’m apparently wild about the idea of a matching hat. And yet, thus far, I have never once done that. Which means I have a lot of leftovers, which is why you’re always hearing me speculate about a leftovers blanket or even a leftovers sweater. But the fact is, I do really love the idea of using them to make myself an array of very plain but perfectly coordinated hats — hats that hopefully meet my exacting requirements for a hat, since I don’t have a super hat-friendly head and won’t wear one if it isn’t just right. Enter Whitney Hayward’s Holcomb Hat, an ultra-basic top-down hat pattern written to work for any gauge and intended size. She describes it as ideal for using up handspun (unpredictable gauge) and those mysterious no-longer-labeled stash yarns we all have rolling around, but I love this specifically for project leftovers because you’ve already established your gauge, thereby negating the need to commit any of your yarn to a swatch while simultaneously increasing the likelihood of nailing the fit.

The thing about a top-down hat is it’s the same as a top-down sweater: Trying it on as you go is all well and good, but you need to know how blocking will affect the finished fabric. As long as you remember to count, not measure, you should be good. And a fold-up brim always gives you wiggle room on the length.

I’m hereby swearing to do this when I’m done with my current sweater, leftover yardage permitting.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Goose Eye

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