New Favorites: Every stitch of the Tov collection

New Favorites: Every stitch of the Tov collection

I mentioned recently that I’d gotten a sneak peek from the set of the shoot for a new collection and that there was a cardigan I was losing sleep over. It turns out the entire collection — the Tov Collection from Woolfolk, for their latest yarn, Tov — is drop-dead ridiculously to-die-for gorgeous. For me, and what makes my heart race, it’s the single best pattern collection I’ve seen in the five years I’ve been doing this.

Here’s the thing: the day the lookbook first snuck into my inbox, I got the vapors. But before making a claim like “best I’ve seen in five years,” I have to stop and check myself. Let’s face it: the photography, the house, the ivory yarn and cables — it pushes every one of my buttons. Was I being swayed by all of that, or are these patterns as good as I initially thought they were? Having looked at it more times now than I care to admit, I can honestly say: Take away the house, make the garments colors I don’t like, whatever — they’re stupendous.

So here are my favorites: All of them! Starting, of course, with the sweaters:

Vidje by Kristin Ford, above, is the cardigan I was on about. This design is a tightrope walk; it could have so easily gone awry, but the bands of texture blocking are beautifully done. I mean, the shift in scale of the honeycomb is so gorgeous I’m hellbent on knitting this thing even though I hate knitting honeycomb! It might take me two years to finish it, but I ain’t lettin’ that stop me.

New Favorites: Every stitch of the Tov collection

Bue by (newcomer?) Nele Redweik might manage to distract me from Vidje for a minute. I’ve been planning to do a pattern for a sleeveless cabled tunic, but now I don’t have to! This is perfection.

New Favorites: Every stitch of the Tov collection

Gevir by Sarah Solomon represents that balance I think we’re always looking for, of a garment that’s striking — what I like to call a trophy knit — but also very practical and wearable. The combination of wide ribs and vertebrae-like cables, the way they’re deployed here, is slimming rather than adding bulk. And it feels extremely fashionable and classic at the same time. Absolutely gorgeous.

New Favorites: Every stitch of the Tov collection

And then there are the accessories:

TOP: Rille by Olga Buraya-Kefelian is just fantastic looking hat — must have

BOTTOM LEFT: Mont by Olga Buraya-Kefelian is a pair of long mitts that are just a good thing done well

BOTTOM RIGHT: Arkade by Antonia Shankland is the weirdest stitch pattern I’ve ever seen, makes no sense to my brain, but I find the dimensionality and pillowiness of it fascinating!

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Mitten mania

New Favorites: the Arranmore collection

New Favorites: the Arranmore collection

Do you guys remember those gorgeous skeins of charcoal and teal tweed yarn I posted about a few months ago and couldn’t say what they were? It can now be revealed that it’s the new Arranmore from The Fibre Co. — a yarn I cannot wait to knit with. (If only I could pick a color!) But what’s even better than the yarn is the collection of patterns that my friends at Kelbourne Woolens designed for it. The weirdly lit photos are bumming me out, unfortunately, but I saw these pieces in person at the trade show and there isn’t a single sweater or accessory in the whole collection that I wouldn’t want in my closet. And how often do you hear me say that? Pictured are the Killybegs cardigan and Swilly scarf by Meghan Kelly and Rosses hat by Courtney Kelley, but go look at the whole shebang. So good.

UPDATE: Check out the alternate colorway samples that went up on their blog late last week. GORGEOUS.

UNRELATED: I keep meaning to tell you the new autumn issue of Pom Pom has landed at Fringe Supply Co., chock full of good patterns and ready and waiting for you!

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: from Interweave Knits’ 20th extravaganza

New Favorites: Swans Island’s S/M/L cable scarves

New Favorites: Swans Island's S/M/L cable scarves

I know I don’t have to tell you how happy I am that the annual July seepage of Fall patterns has begun. In a rare deluge, Swans Island published an incredible number of patterns this month, but there doesn’t seem to be any way to see them all collected together. Don’t worry, though — I’ve mined their complete archive in search of the latest additions and will be doling them out for some time! But what better way to ease into the season than to start working on a cable scarf? They’ve presented us with three options:

TOP: At the small end of the scale is the Woodlands Scarf by Talitha Kuomi, narrow and unisex, with symmetrical stacks of thin wishbone cables running up the center

MIDDLE: Clocking in at mid-scale wrap proportions is the Algonquin Wrap by Michele Rose Orne, with a mix of open diamonds and dense braids

BOTTOM: And then there’s the large-scale Fireside Wrap by Leah Coccari-Swift, with its big doughy cables

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Thanks so much for reading this week, everyone, and for all the enthusiasm about the upcoming Fringe and Friends Knitalong! I know I’ll be spending a chunk of time this weekend starting to sort out what I want to knit, and I hope you will too! Whatever you’re up to this weekend, I hope it’s a good one …

And if you need anything from Fringe Supply Co., we’re here for you!

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Retro cable bliss

Spring-into-Summer scarves

Spring-into-Summer scarves

We may be cutting it a bit close to knit something for Mother’s Day (this Sunday!), but I definitely wouldn’t put it past some of you. When I originally did this roundup of little scarves, it was with the idea that you might pick one for mom but, as is still true, they’re all light and lovely and especially useful for the Spring-into-Summer season. For yourself or a loved one. To see them all with pattern details, click through to the original post: Pretty spring scarves: Or, what to knit for Mother’s Day.

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Knit the Look: Windowpane scarf

Knit the Look: Windowpane scarf

We’re headed into that blissful time of year where you can trade in your coat for just a big glorious scarf, and I adore this windowpane-check number photographed on model Taylor Marie Hill. Hers is woven and fringed, but for a knitted alternative, all you need is Olga Buraya-Kefelian’s pattern Bygge. It’s written for the luxurious Woolfolk Tynd, and would be gorgeous in Color 15 (black) and Color 1 (ivory). Olga varies the size of the checks, which you could do or not do, according to your preference. And of course, there’s always room for fringe!

See Vanessa’s original post for additional photos of this gem.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Charlotte Groeneveld’s cozy turtleneck

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Ultra-stockinette scarf

Knit the Look: Ultra-stockinette scarf

If you have a cable sweater as swoony as this one photographed by Vanessa Jackman, and the perfect pale cocoon coat to go over it, what better to complement it with than the ultimate stockinette scarf? This one is as simple as can be, but striking because of its scale and how nicely it plays with others. It almost looks like it’s made from flat felt instead of yarn, or something, but what you or I would want for our version is some mega yarn, such as Loopy Mango’s Big Loop merino, and a pair of US50 knitting needles. Then all you need to do is figure out your gauge and multiply that by how wide you want your scarf to be — e.g., if you’re at 1.5″ per stitch, 8 stitches would make a 12″ wide scarf. Work in stockinette will you run out of yarn or reach your desired length, whichever comes first!

See Vanessa’s post for another view.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Anya Ziourova’s cropped raglan

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

 

New Favorites: Winter blues

New Favorites: Winter blues

The “Winter Blues” issue of Amirisu is out and it’s easily one of my favorite issues, not least because of the dark-yoked sweater in there. In fact, I’m obsessed with the idea of knitting all three of these pieces, each of which employs colorwork in an intriguing way:

TOP: Skaftafell by Beatrice Perron Dahlen is an updated lopapeysa with simplified colorwork at the yoke

BOTTOM LEFT: Tenchi by Olga Buraya-Kefelian is a cowl worked in modified two-color brioche

BOTTOM RIGHT: Jokull by Keiko Kikuno is a large wrap that combines three ideas — ombré, colorwork and houndstooth — and somehow winds up being mesmerizingly spare instead of a big mess

I also really love the art direction and styling here — all so good. Of course, I have a stack of them for you at Fringe Supply Co, but having now seen the issue in person, I think I should have ordered more!

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Dark-yoked sweaters