Knit the Look: Jenny Gordy’s comfiest cardigan

Knit the Look: Jenny Gordy's comfiest cardigan

Switching sources for a minute — from our usual Knit the Look street-style scenes — let’s talk about this cardigan seen on Jenny Gordy (of Wiksten) in her Instagram feed on Saturday. The whole outfit is my idea of heaven right now (more on that subject soon) but the cardigan looks like you could just crawl into it and not come out till spring, which is exactly what I’m craving now that the weather has finally turned. Jenny tells me it’s a Toast cardigan from a few years ago, no longer available, but easy enough to simulate. I think it’s literally three rectangles — one back and two fronts — sewn together at the shoulders and side seams. Tubes for sleeves, plus several inches of ribbing around the neckline for a foldover shawl-collar sort of thing. So you could easily come up with your own dimensions and gauge and so on, but if you prefer a pattern, my friend Kathy just recently knitted Pam Allen’s Edith and that seems like a great starting point. The details and proportions are different, of course, so if you want to make it more like Jenny’s, go wider and a little shorter; work standard ribbing; knit the sleeves entirely in ribbing; knit the neckband twice as wide for the foldover; make the pockets larger and ribbed; and omit the decorative panel at the top of the back. Edith is written for Quince and Co wool-alpaca Owl (pictured in Buru); Kathy used Hinterland rambouillet-alpaca Range. I’m sure both are exquisite, but I think for me I’d go with 100% wool and keep it as light and lofty as possible.

TANGENTIAL AND COINCIDENTAL: The second issue of Making magazine has arrived at Fringe Supply Co. and contains patterns by both Jenny and me, and actually just an astonishing number of patterns and projects. You can take a peek and get your copy right here.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Deepest, blackest turtleneck

Photo © Jenny Gordy, used with permission

Knit the Look: Deepest, blackest turtleneck

Knit the Look: Deepest, blackest turtleneck

So I’ve been working on a sleeve of my Channel Cardigan and have developed a pretty serious obsession with the “half brioche” stitch that forms the pronounced rib portion of the overall stitch pattern. There’s something crazy satisfying about working those stitches, and I love the texture of it. After seeing Jen’s revised knitalong swatch using this stitch, I almost decided to copy her for my fafkal do-over! Then last night I was cruising Vanessa Jackman’s blog and ran into this photo of a girl in a black turtleneck with a pronounced rib stitch that looks a lot like brioche or half brioche! Luscious. So to emulate it, all you need is the Improv top-down tutorial, the half brioche stitch (below), and some gooshy, deeply black yarn. For this scale, I’m thinking maybe Quince and Co. Osprey (aran weight) in Crow. For the turtleneck, pick up stitches as for a crewneck and work in 2×2 rib for that slight contrast with the sweater body. (When knitting a turtleneck, I like to pick up stitches with a needle two sizes smaller than the main fabric and work half the height of the neck — i.e., to the fold — then go up one needle size for the rest. So the outer part is slightly larger than the inner part.)

HALF BRIOCHE WORKED FLAT:

RS: *p1, k1 below; repeat from *; p1
WS: knit

HALF BRIOCHE WORKED IN THE ROUND:

Row 1: *p1, k1 below; repeat from *; p1
Row 2: purl

See Vanessa’s original post for more pics of this sweater.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Nastya Zhidkikh’s sexy little pullover

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Nastya Zhidkikh’s sexy little pullover

Knit the Look: Nastya Zhidkikh's sexy little pullover

I just ran across this older photo of Vanessa Jackman’s I had bookmarked awhile back, and had a whole new reaction to it. It’s Russian model Nastya Zhidkikh wearing a sweater that Jess did the perfect swatch for in her first Swatch of the Month post! It’s fisherman’s rib knitted on proportionally large needles for an open, lacy fabric, but in this case it looks like there’s a little bit of gauge-blocking as well: The upper part of the front yoke is done at a finer gauge. If you skip over that little detail and do it all at one gauge, this would be super simple to replicate as a top-down raglan, using my Improv pattern. Seriously, it’s like Jess’ swatch, Jen’s knitalong sweater and my black lopi raglan all merged into this sweater. If you like the marl of Nastya’s sweater, you could hold two strands of fingering-weight yarn together and use even larger needles than Jess did. I like the idea of using a Shibui’s sport-weight Twig for this — a blend of linen, recycled silk and wool with an unusual texture that I think might hold up nicely to this use! And if you’re not into the visible bra trend, it would look fantastic over a little camisole.

See this post of Vanessa’s for additional photos of this sweater — same model, different day.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Windowpane scarf

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Windowpane scarf

Knit the Look: Windowpane scarf

We’re headed into that blissful time of year where you can trade in your coat for just a big glorious scarf, and I adore this windowpane-check number photographed on model Taylor Marie Hill. Hers is woven and fringed, but for a knitted alternative, all you need is Olga Buraya-Kefelian’s pattern Bygge. It’s written for the luxurious Woolfolk Tynd, and would be gorgeous in Color 15 (black) and Color 1 (ivory). Olga varies the size of the checks, which you could do or not do, according to your preference. And of course, there’s always room for fringe!

See Vanessa’s original post for additional photos of this gem.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Charlotte Groeneveld’s cozy turtleneck

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Charlotte Groeneveld’s cozy turtleneck

Knit the Look: Charlotte Groeneveld's cozy turtleneck

How pretty does fashion blogger Charlotte Groeneveld look in this big shell pink overcoat wrapped around a simple grey turtleneck over ivory culottes? I know a lot of people recoil from this shade of pink (I personally love it) but who can argue with the sweater? To knit your own, all you need is Michele Wang’s new Cadence pattern — just skip the textured stitch on the body if you like. And it’s written for Brooklyn Tweed’s Shelter, which offers the perfect icy-pale grey in Snowbound. I did a little bit of Google image searching to try to get a better look at the neck on Charlotte’s sweater, and it’s either a mock tneck or just a snugger, skimpier turtleneck. So if you prefer that look, knit to the smallest neck size your head will allow and cut down the height of the ribbing by a couple of inches. Then extend the cuff ribbing by few inches as well.

See Vanessa’s original post for more get-the-look suggestions.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Ultra-stockinette scarf

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Ultra-stockinette scarf

Knit the Look: Ultra-stockinette scarf

If you have a cable sweater as swoony as this one photographed by Vanessa Jackman, and the perfect pale cocoon coat to go over it, what better to complement it with than the ultimate stockinette scarf? This one is as simple as can be, but striking because of its scale and how nicely it plays with others. It almost looks like it’s made from flat felt instead of yarn, or something, but what you or I would want for our version is some mega yarn, such as Loopy Mango’s Big Loop merino, and a pair of US50 knitting needles. Then all you need to do is figure out your gauge and multiply that by how wide you want your scarf to be — e.g., if you’re at 1.5″ per stitch, 8 stitches would make a 12″ wide scarf. Work in stockinette will you run out of yarn or reach your desired length, whichever comes first!

See Vanessa’s post for another view.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Anya Ziourova’s cropped raglan

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

 

Knit the Look: Anya Ziourova’s cropped raglan

Knit the Look: Anya Ziourova's cropped raglan

While I’m not the biggest fan of the overall butterscotchness of this outfit photographed on Russian fashion editor Anya Ziourova, I like the proportions: cropped, fitted sweater with slim, high-waisted skirt. And I like that the subtle marl of the yarn gives just a tiny bit of interest to a fairly simple pullover. For knitting a version of this one, I would definitely say just improvise it top-down. Pick two low-contrast shades of your favorite fingering-weight yarn and hold them together (pictured is Loft in Fossil and Tallow); knit a swatch to get your stitch gauge; and go for it. To capture the interesting bits of Anya’s sweater, work the sleeves and six or eight raglan stitches in 1×1 rib. Work the body in stockinette until just below the bust, then switch to 1×1 and knit until just above your belly button, or just enough to overlap the waistband of your favorite high-waisted skirt or pants.

See Vanessa’s post for full-length shots of this ensemble.

UNRELATED BUT SUPER IMPORTANT: If you are Lorna in Canada or Carey in the UK and you’ve recently ordered from Fringe Supply Co, please email me at contact@fringesupplyco.com — emails to your address are bouncing!

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Big scarf season

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission