New Favorites: from The Artisan

New Favorites: from The Artisan

You guys know how much I’ve loved some of Helga Isager’s past collections (2012, 2013, 2014), and when the images from her new book, The Artisan, started showing up on the Internet, I knew I was not only going to be saving a ton of them at Ravelry for later, but that I would want to stock this one in the shop. It arrived last night (the English version) and I swear I almost slept with it under my pillow, hoping I could wake up inside of it. The whole thing is incredible, but my top picks are:

TOP: Pearls – an allover diagonal-stitch pullover

BOTTOM LEFT: Birch – a cozy slouchy cocoon cardigan

BOTTOM RIGHT: Twine – a fuzzy little cabled turtleneck

You can see the whole pattern set at Ravelry and pick up a copy of the book at Fringe Supply Co.!

p.s. If you’ve had your eye on the black Field Bag, please be aware it’s now in limited supply, so get it while they last!

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Chevron hats

New Favorites: Chevron hats

New Favorites: Chevron hats

I’ve heard from so many of you that you’d love to knit the Channel cardigan but aren’t sure about taking on the scale of the project. And then there’s me (and others), having worked that lovely stitch pattern and missing it. So for all of us, here are some recent hat patterns with differently enticing chevron stitches to entertain us:

TOP: Braddock by Christina Danaee

MIDDLE: Quill by Andrea Mowry (in the current issue of Taproot)

BOTTOM: Prism by Emily Greene

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Texture by the yard

Knit the Look: Marthe Wiggers’ vintage-chic pullover

Knit the Look: Marthe Wiggers' vintage-chic pullover

I love how simultaneously retro and au courant Dutch model Marthe Wiggers looks in this slinky, ribbed, black mock-neck sweater and motorcycle jacket. Such simplicity with that sweater, and as usual what makes it noteworthy are the tiny little details — the proportion of the peaks and valleys of that ribbing, and the shift in scale from the sweater to the neck. Which is easy enough to emulate. Vintage patterns would be the best bet on this one, but there are some available options to work from. There’s a reasonably similar Rowan pattern from a few years ago, Fiori (just add ribbing) but it’s worsted weight, whereas Marthe’s sweater seems to be a fine-gauge machine knit. So I’m going to recommend Pierrot’s characteristically rudimentary, English-translated Japanese pattern called 22-23-20 Ribbed Turtleneck Sweater (free pattern), which is written for fingering weight. (As with pretty much all Japanese patterns, it’s one size, so add to the stitch count as/where necessary to adjust the width.) To make it look more like Marthe’s, try the rib in 2×1 or even 3×1, switching to 1×1 on smaller needles for the collar. And instead of knitting the neck to full turtleneck length, stop at about 3”. Yarn-wise, for that gorgeous heathered black I’m a big fan of Quince and Co’s Sabine colorway, which is available in fingering-weight Finch.

For more photos and Marthe’s full outfit, see Vanessa’s original blog post. And for guidance on how to read a Japanese knitting pattern, click here.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Camille Charriere’s stripes

Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Elsewhere

Elsewhere: Yarny links for your clicking pleasure

Hi, happy Friday! Before we get into this installment of Elsewhere, I want to profess my love for all of the comments you left on Monday’s post about Folkwear. So many lovely stories and memories, then the cherry on top was THIS. The whole thing gave me heartmelt, and I want to again wish Folkwear’s new owner, Molly, so much luck in reviving this legendary brand. Ok—

Knitting Pretty — I’ll be watching this short vintage film ce weekend (photo top left)

– Are you playing along with MDK March Mayhem?

– If you haven’t been following Kristine Vejar’s textile adventures in Bali and Java, go look while it’s still at the top of her feed! (bottom right)

Felt as “fossilised fabric” (and can I go to that retreat, please?)

Is that a “hank,” a “skein,” a “ball” … ? (bottom left)

– I love this Seamwork profile of Asiatica, one of my hometown’s most distinctive businesses

– Where do you stand on Missoni’s pussyhats? Here’s Michele Wang’s take

Alabama Chanin has some upcycling to do (top right)

Heaven is layers of sweaters

– And this gorgeous woman and her crocheted scarf on The Sartorialist

I’m excited about this weekend — I blocked the pieces of my Channel last weekend and get to stitch them together. It’s been clear for a few days that this sweater is taking a little change in direction, though, and I’ll have more to say about that next week!

I hope you have an awesome weekend. As always, I’d love to hear what you’re working on …

SHOP NEWS: We’ve got a new batch of the Lykke straight needles sets (along with the individual sizes) and Knitters Graph Paper Journals, and all of the mini scissors (except the owls) are back in stock. Along with so many other gems at Fringe Supply Co.!

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PREVIOUSLY : Elsewhere

 

 

New Favorites: Texture by the yard

New Favorites: Texture by the yard

Working on my Channel cardigan over the last several weeks has deepened my appreciation for textured fabric created through knits and purls rather than cables or lace stitches. There’s something so meditative and melodious about knitting those stitches and watching the fabric build, which has me craving more of that. And has sent me back to my favorites in search of scarf patterns that not only allow you to just sit there and create texture, stitch by stitch, but are the ultimate showcase for the finished yardage, as it were:

TOP: Binary by Michele Wang features large, alternating blocks of texture

BOTTOM LEFT: Facade by Shellie Anderson is almost certainly not just knits and purls — wrapped stitches, maybe? — but look at that beautiful texture-blocking and how a simple rectangle shows off the fabric

BOTTOM RIGHT: Broken Garter Scarf from Purl Soho employs one of the simplest of sequence knitting combinations to great effect (free pattern)

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Spring shawls

Rabbit Hole: Folkwear patterns

Rabbit Hole: Folkwear patterns

When I posted my Idea Log for an indigo kimono last month, reader Marta Sullivan recommended a pattern at Folkwear.com — #112 Japanese Field Clothing — which I promptly ordered for the pants! And then I spent the next several hours happily (painstakingly) clicking through the pages of their outdated website, before resorting to the PDF catalog for easier browsing. Founded in the mid-1970s, Folkwear is a purveyor of “patterns with timeless style” — vintage or cultural classics (ranging from a cheongsam to a Navajo blouse to Marilyn Monroe-wear) that have equal appeal to costumers, reenactors and those of us who think a good French Cheesemaker’s Smock never goes out of style. The range of patterns is amazing, and the closer I looked the more in love I fell, as I discovered that many of them include companion knit or crochet patterns. #240 Rosie the Riveter (above) contains instructions for a coordinating knitted cardigan and “a crocheted snood that keeps hair in place.” #137 Australian Drover’s Coat (one of my favorites!) has a textured turtleneck pattern to go with. #238 Le Smoking Jacket includes the perfect little knitted tank to wear under it. And check out the cardigan with poodle appliqué that accompanies the circle skirt in #256 At the Hop! And that’s just scraping the surface. The pattern I ordered didn’t happen to have a knit component, so I’m curious to see how bare-bones vintage-pattern-style they might be.

Oh, and each pattern comes with a little history lesson about the garment(s)!

A few days ago, a friend mentioned she’d found Folkwear on Instagram. The account was just created on January 3; a new owner was announced on Jan 12; and she launched a new website last week. The new site is much easier to navigate, and I’m happy to see the delightfully dated photos survived although the PDF catalog seems not to have. [UPDATE: Here it is!] Just make sure you have some time before you click through! It is a definite rabbit hole.

I’d love to hear from anyone who has any experience with these patterns — and thanks again to Marta for bringing it to my attention!

New Favorites: Spring shawls

New Favorites: Spring shawls

March! That time of the year when we all start to ditch our coats and knitters replace them with shawls instead of jackets—

TOP: With Ease by Sylvia McFadden looks to me like it’s knitted from the left edge to the right tip, which is as tempting as that gorgeous stitch pattern

MIDDLE LEFT: Black River Blanket Shawl by Sam Lamb is a basic top-down triangle shawl with the visual punch of a trio of stripes

MIDDLE RIGHT: Flindra by Libby Jonson is an elongated triangle with intriguing construction plus slip-stitch colorwork

BOTTOM: Goderich Blanket by Tara-Lynn Morrison is a small rectangle worn as a wrap — love that “diagonal rib” stitch (free pattern)

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Bohème big and small