New Favorites: Bohème big and small

New Favorites: Bohème big and small

I am fairly obsessed with the notion of knitting another colorwork-yoke sweater (following my St. Brendan), and soon. There are tons of contenders (and another on the horizon apparently — UPDATE, that came out today: Skógafjall), but last week I was going through my Ravelry favorites and the one that made my heart race the fastest is a kids’ pattern called Bohème for Kids by Randi Hjelm Debes. I had it in my head that I was going to do another “in my size, please” post, but just a couple of days later the adult version, predictably called Bohème Sweater, magically appeared! I absolutely love the simple geometry of the motif and the way in which the two colors transition across it. So I’m pondering colors for the time being …

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Vodka on the Rocks

21 thoughts on “New Favorites: Bohème big and small

  1. I’m totally intimidated (if not scared) by colorwork, both because it’s seems a lot of work and because I’m not sure I would wear it. But if it were the next theme for the Fringe and friend’s KAL, I’d be in ! I’m dreaming about Spearheads by Jared Flood, which is a sort of colorwork for minimalists.
    BTW : the Tolt pattern is out, it’s Skógafjall by Dianna Walla !
    And have you seen the colorwork yoke from the soon-to-be “Making Stories” magazine ? The picture on their IG is beautiful.

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  2. I will be interested to see what yarn you pick. I wonder if the suggested yarn is like the Loopi yarn?
    I don’t think you should knit as shown or it will look to similar to your other beautiful sweater.

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  3. Oh I’ve seen this sweater and I love it. I’ve never done a colourwork yoke but it’s something I’d love to try. The only thing I’d change about this one would be the amount of ease – I’d need a lot more to feel confortable in a sweater. I will watch this space to see just how your version will turn out!!!

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  4. This one’s been on my Someday list for awhile. I plan to –eventually– knit a pair of these for my grandsons, but using an acrylic worsted like Lion Brand so that my daughter won’t have to hand wash the boys’ sweaters. And also because these boys are hard on their clothes…I won’t feel bad if they end up wearing out elbows or tearing a hole in something that cost twenty bucks’ worth of yarn vs costing sixty bucks’ worth!

    So that they aren’t too “twinsy,” I’m thinking I’ll probably use grey as the MC for both sweaters but use different colors for the CC.

    When I get around to them, that is!

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  5. Glad to see another yoke. I just finished the yoke (my first) of my Kate Davies “Epistrophy.” (still needs sleeves as you suggested in your recent post to knit them after the body) For any faint-of-heart, go for it. It is really not as difficult as it looks. Do some wandering around the internet for suggestions or find/buy a copy of “Mastering Color Knitting” by Melissa Leapman. OR convince Karen to do a tutorial lesson!

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  6. This is gorgeous and I can’t wait to see what colors you come up with–please show us a bunch of options?! I have been practicing stranded color work in anticipation of someday having the technique honed enough to do a nice sweater. I am a left handed yarn holder having learned from my Danish mother and grandmother. Recently trying to learn how to hold yarn in my right hand and knit has been … a project onto itself! Was it really this hard to learn how to knit way back when??? haha, but well worth it as I can see it well it works and easy once practiced enough.

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  7. Pingback: New Favorites: Spring shawls | Fringe Association

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