KTFO-2016.10 : Sleeveless top redux, this time with pockets!

FO : Blue stripe sleeveless, this time with pockets!

Monday’s Idea Log post was written last week before I left for DC for the weekend, for the trade show, and in the meantime I finished sewing the second version of my sleeveless top, which I alluded to in that post. This one uses the same pattern pieces I had drafted for the black top, but with three key differences:

1.) I fixed the back neck to the way it was originally meant to be — just a crewneck, thank you. Several people have asked, with regard to this and its predecessor and the sketch of the dress version — whether this neck hole goes over my head. As you can see, it does!

2.) I added pockets! As noted in Monday’s post, they’re based on my beloved linen tunic’s pockets. I’m mad about these, and also pretty damn pleased with my pattern matching.

3.) This has the same split hem as the black one, but because I’m lazy and this fabric is a bit shreddy, I French seamed the shoulders and side seams, having done the same thing on my linen Gallery dress. What happens if you try to combine French seams and a side slit is you have to clip the seam allowance right at the bottom of the French seam in order to be able to turn it under to finish the remaining edges. I like how it gives a sort of lapped side seam.

So this one is a major winner. It’s more of the $5/yard Japanese cotton remnant fabric I got from Imogene+Willie last summer (the one on top in this photo), and it’s divinely soft and wonderful to work with and to wear. Factoring in the bias tape, I’m guessing I might have used just over a yard.

These pics were taken at the end of the day on Saturday after hours of trade show meandering and back-to-back meetings and walking and walking and walking. It was inhumanly hot in downtown DC, so right after this, I changed into my aforementioned Earthen Slip with this top over it, and that’s officially my new favorite outfit — but alas I have no photos of that! Suffice to say, it’s a versatile little dream of a garment.

Next up: the dress version!

Pattern: self-drafted*
Fabric: Unknown Japanese cotton remnant bought for $5/yard
Cost: no pattern + $6 fabric = $6

FO : Blue stripe sleeveless, this time with pockets!

*Fancy Tiger has a muscle tank pattern publishing very, very soon with which you could no doubt sew a facsimile of this

29 thoughts on “KTFO-2016.10 : Sleeveless top redux, this time with pockets!

  1. I love pockets and these have to be the cutest pockets ever! The whole top is just perfect, you should diffinately give yourself a pat on the back for this one.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. So, I’m not much of a sewer (though, I’d like to get better), but I LOVE those jeans…I’m mad about the front seam. Where can I find such wonders?

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  3. Super cute, and looks great on you. It is the same shape as a navy linen top I posted on IG a few weeks ago. Length is shorter on mine and I added some seam and stitch details that might interest you (or not, ha, ha). The only thing that baffles me is how you get a crew neck like that over your head! I most certainly needed a keyhole in the back.

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  4. Great design! Does it pull over the head or is there a back neck opening? I am just starting on a lightweight sweater and making a lower back hem that is split too. CYA-“cover your ass” tops!

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  5. Amazing work. You really make delving into sewing to produce lovely garments as a relative beginner (not that you are!) seem supremely possible! Thank you for sharing your process.

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  6. That top looks so great! Congrats! Love that pattern matching! And bravo on self drafting. When I first started sewing in earnest, I tried drafting a tank from a favorite RTW with only moderate success. I figure I’ll try again after I have more practice. But your post is a reminder that I don’t need years of experience before trying again–just buckle down & experiment!

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  7. The top is really wonderful and how satisfying to have pieced it together sans pattern! I did the same thing looking carefully from every angle at the Harper tunic and came up with a garment I love using a washed out black linen. Sometimes the subtleties of what makes a garment work so well are difficult to pinpoint when attempting to make a simile but the differences also make it your own.

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  8. Gorgeous. It was good seeing you this weekend, I love this top! Can’t wait to see the dress, either. Did you buy the fabric at an I&W sale? I need to buy jeans from them at some point. Where are yours from? Love the pinstripe pleat!

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    • It was just some remnants, I’m assuming, sitting around in pretty bundles in baskets along one of the walls. Someone told me recently that’s not likely to happen again, now that they’ve moved all of their production to LA, so it’s good that I stocked up!

      The pants are from the Gap several years ago.

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