Knit the Look: Elisabeth Erm’s everyday everywhere sweater

Knit the Look: Elisabeth Erm's everyday everywhere sweater

This is two Looks in a row featuring a statement mini paired with an ultra-basic slouchy sweater. In the case of this Elisabeth Erm ensemble, it’s more of a summer-into-fall sort of pullover — drop-shouldered, long-sleeved, thin but warm. The sort of sweater you think of as your weekend sweater but you actually would happily wear seven days a week, for as much of the year as you can get away with, layered over everything from your best shirt to your nightshirt. The trouble with oversized sweaters is it’s a fine line between slouchy and sloppy. Wearing men’s sweaters isn’t really the answer. Which is why I love Jared Flood’s Agnes as the recommended pattern for this — slouchy and drop-shouldered but with all the necessary proportioning to keep you from drowning in it. The only difference between it and Elisabeth’s sweater is the edging. Knit a long ribbed hem (elongating the sweater in the process), ribbed cuffs and a ribbed neckband — and, of course, skip the stripes in this case — and voilà! If you like it tweedy, go with Brooklyn Tweed Loft in Fossil. Or for a really luxurious, pure ivory version, knit it in Woolfolk Tynd in color 01.

See Vanessa’s post for more shots of the sweater and Elisabeth’s most excellent sneakers.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Kia Low’s perfect summer sweater

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

8 thoughts on “Knit the Look: Elisabeth Erm’s everyday everywhere sweater

  1. So I’ve tried on the Agnes samples (both versions!), and while I like the pattern quite a bit, I did not love it in Loft — the fabric had very little drape, and hung away from my body in a way I found awkward (and definitely un-slouchy!). So if you want the fluid drape of the inspiration look, I’d choose a yarn with more drapey potential, either due to fiber content (alpaca? silk?) or yarn construction (probably not woolen-spun).

    Btw, I think the yarn in the photo is Får, not Tynd (Får is chainette, Tynd is a two-ply with a fairly tight twist).

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  2. Here’s an idea for a great post, do a list of what yarns drape and what don’t, what characteristics, content, manufacturing techniques, etc. we should look for. I am finally learning that the yarn choice, its end fluidity, is huge in achieving the desire effect. @Julia, thanks so much for bringing this up!

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  3. Pingback: Knit the Look: Slouchy sweater perfection | Fringe Association

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