New Favorites: Mosaic scarves

New Favorites: Mosaic scarves

Of the things I’d like to try my hand at this year, mosaic knitting is probably at the top of the list. And it seems to be in the air; it’s everywhere I look these days. Mosaic knitting is colorwork without the stranding or floats. By working one color per row, and strategically slipping the stitches from the previous row, you wind up with a reversible fabric. It sounds like magic! I’m particularly smitten with these two big fringed mosaic scarves from two of the winter knitting mags, both of which include multiple mosaic patterns—

TOP: #05 Long Fringed Scarf by John Brinegar from Vogue Knitting Winter 2014/15

BOTTOM: Tessellating Leaves Scarf by Ann McDonald Kelly from Knitscene Winter 2014

If I try the technique and it seems doable, I might have to go with the whole amazing blanket. And in fact, this looks like a very good issue of Vogue Knitting — I like this and this and this and this. Bonus points for the toned down styling!

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Favorite New Favorites of 2014

15 thoughts on “New Favorites: Mosaic scarves

  1. WOW! these are amazing… will put this on “the list” of “why I will never get bored with knitting”! thanks Karen! let us know if you have the opportunity to play with this technique – would love to hear from others who have maybe already gone there.

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  2. Really beautiful! I have done some swatching of a few slip stitch color patterns in the back of one of my stitch bibles. Fun and easy, but goes quite slowly, mostly because of the row density. But these are pretty special, and considering my N.Y.s resolution, really worth a commitment.

    FYI, Karen, the links were going to the dogs when I tried them. ;-)

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  3. Oooh, it does look like a very good issue indeed! Darn it, always takes a little longer for it to come out in the U.K. (as Designer Knitting mag). Mosaic knitting is fun and once you’ve done the set-up rows, fairly easy to follow along because you just let the colours dictate what you need to do. I’ve only ever done small projects, coasters etc. But these scarves look amazing!

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  4. I think that you will enjoy Mosaic knitting tremendously. I was first exposed to it when I worked through the “Learn to Knit Afghan” book by Barbara G. Walker. She devotes an entire section of this book to the technique. I enjoyed every one of those squares. It’s a wonderful way to do colorwork. Good luck!

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  5. Adding these in to my favourites. Love seeing things that I would actually wear daily. Now, if it only weren’t summer here. Maybe I should just go for the blanket to keep me busy until winter ;)

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  6. I knit a slip-stitch purse a few years ago that I made up as I went along. Nothing too intricate—just an experiment to see if I could do it, and wow, people stop me when I wear it to ask about it.

    Love the scarves, especially the exactly, perfectly even fringe. (Like that association? ;-)

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  7. Trish Malcolm brought many of these pieces to a recent Big Apple Knitters Guild meeting. They were gorgeous. I especially liked the #06 Art Deco in silk mohair. The advice Trish had for mosaic newbies was to start with yarns of high contrast. On my to do list for sure.

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  8. So glad you posted about these! When I first saw the #05 scarf I got excited, finally a pattern to learn mosaic—magical indeed! I love the geo patterns it produces. I’m tempted to try the the blanket too. It was a nice surprise to see so many interesting patterns in one issue of Vogue. I might also be obsessing over Nora Gaughan’s plaid piece. After seeing and knitting so many lovely neutrals, maybe I’m needing some color and pattern in my life.

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  9. Agree with you, this whole issue of Vogue Knitting is superb, with so many great patterns. The whole Easy Street section is great, and I’m also really tempted to try mosaic just for the fun of it. Do try it, please, and let us know how it goes.

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  10. Pingback: New Favorites: from Madder Anthology 2 | Fringe Association

  11. Pingback: Favorite New Favorites of 2015 | Fringe Association

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