Knit the Look: Or, make that crochet?

Knit the Look: Crocheted wrap with fringe

Crochet the Look? I love the pretty fringed wrap on this unidentified model after the latest Margaret Howell show — especially right now, since it’s the perfect seasonal transition piece. As is often the case, the details are hard to discern from Vanessa’s street-style photo, but it sure looks like crochet to me, so I called on Cal Patch for a consult. Cal agrees, and had the same thought as me: that it might very well be a triangular shawl with fringe along the two sides, wrapped in scarf-like fashion. Maybe even as simple as a big half-granny square, with fringe added. Another great option would be Cal’s Wingfeathers Shawl pattern, crocheted in a worsted or heavier yarn. If you prefer a rectangular scarf, you could also follow the Purl Bee’s Granny Stripe Blanket instructions and just change the dimensions to a wrap-sized (rather than bed-sized) rectangle, then add fringe along one long edge. Wrap and go. Whichever you choose, it would be lovely in the Purl Soho Worsted Twist in that Heirloom White I love so much.

See Vanessa’s post for an additional view.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Marte Mei Van Haaster’s perfect grey pullover

Knit the Look: Marte Mei Van Haaster’s perfect grey pullover

How to knit Marte Mei Van Haaster's perfect grey pullover

I’ve been obsessing over this photo of Marte Mei Van Haaster for the past few months. Her skin, the braid, the leather and shearling, the polka dots, and that delicious grey sweater holding it all together. Knitting the sweater is a no-brainer. You could totally improvise it as a top-down raglan — just start with a smallish number of neck stitches, and when you go back to knit your ribbing, knit a few more rounds than you would for a standard crewneck. Or, if you’d prefer to work from a pattern and/or don’t want any raglan seams, which this sweater appears not to have, you could use Jared Flood’s round-yoked Grettir, skip the colorwork and knit a mini-mock neck instead of the full turtleneck. So that part’s easy. The real question here is the yarn! At the trade show last month, Shibui had a new sample of Julie Weisenberger’s Veronika that was knitted with one strand of Pebble held with one strand of Silk Cloud and it was heavenly. Could be the perfect light, airy, halo-y fabric for this, and seems like it would knit up nicely at Grettir’s gauge.

See Vanessa’s post for more of Marte’s outfit.

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Amazing chalk-stripe pullover

Knit your own chalk stripe sweater

I love love love the chalk-stripe sweater seen here on this unidentified girl (and also on Camille Charriere). Jared Flood’s Breton pattern is an excellent blank slate of a sweater, and a good starting point for recreating this one. The entry-level approach would be to knit it in Brooklyn Tweed Loft in Cast Iron, solid. Then go back in with a strand of Fossil or Snowbound and create the stripes with duplicate stitch. The fancier approach would be stranded knitting. You could still use the Breton pattern, divide your body stitches into equal sections and knit every Nth stitch in the white. The trick is, even if you were to knit the body and sleeves in the round, which you could easily do, the sleeve caps and upper front and back would still have to be knitted flat. Which means you’re doing your colorwork from both the right and wrong sides of the work — no big deal for lots of people. Or you could start with any basic-shaped fair isle sweater with steeks for the neck and arm openings (so the whole thing is knitted in the round and then cut open), use that for your template, and knit the stripes instead of whatever colorwork chart the pattern includes. [UPDATE: And the comments are full of lots of other great alternatives!] So many options! But this one would look chic forever.

See Vanessa’s posts here and here for more views of the sweater and outfits.

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Ondria Hardin’s shearling collar

How to knit a version of Ondria Hardin's amazing shearling collar

There’s something wildly enticing about the ultra-curly shearling lining in this motorcycle jacket photographed on model Ondria Hardin. I’m guessing none of us could afford the jacket, whoever makes it. But it’s simple enough to add a statement collar to any jacket you like. Simply knit yourself Tara-Lynn Morrison’s loop-stitch-o-riffic Markham Collar. To mimic Ondria’s shearling, I’d say knit it in something really dark and lustrous, like Purl Soho’s Super Soft Merino in Black.

See Vanessa’s recommendations for the rest of Ondria’s outfit.

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Nadja Bender’s cozy marled turtleneck

How to knit Nadja Bender's cozy grey turtleneck

You guys would not believe how much sweat and angst goes into most installments of Knit the Look. I scour all my various resources and tie myself in knots over the assorted details and modifications. (And am occasionally taken to task for my suggestions.) But this one? Total no-brainer! You like Nadja Bender’s marled grey turtleneck, you knit yourself Michele Wang’s Forester exactly like the sample: that’s Brooklyn Tweed Shelter in Fossil and Sweatshirt. Top down, and at that gauge, you’ll be cruising around town in it in no time.

See Vanessa’s suggestions for recreating the rest of the look, including the killer bicycle.

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Bette Franke’s big crimson beanie

How to knit Bette Franke's red ribbed beanie

I don’t know about you, but I’m in the mood for a quick knitting hit right about now. I’ve been really craving a big ribbed hat with a wide fold-up brim, and am fairly obsessed with that red skullcap I just made for Bob. So can we talk about this excellent crimson ribbed number on Bette Franke? All we need to knit it for ourselves is my own free pattern, the Stadium Hat, adding a couple of inches to the length for the fold up brim. And for the yarn, I’m thinking O-Wool Classic Worsted in Sumac. As they say: Done and done.

See Vanessa’s post for additional shots of the lovely Bette and Sigrid.

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Emily Weiss’s beanie for beginners

How to knit Emily Weiss's grey roll brim beanie

So many monochromatic looks lately in Knit the Look, I know, but I love how chic Emily Weiss of Into the Gloss looks in this all-black outfit with the simple grey beanie. And I mean beginner simple. Consider this the Knit the Look installment of my beginners series, because even if all you know is the knit stitch, you can make this hat. Beginner or not, you can use Stephanie Pearl-McPhee’s free Roll Brim Hat Recipe and any yarn/weight you like. To get the mini-roll look of Emily’s hat, you could knit it in any sport weight or lighter yarn, but I’d go with something special so it doesn’t wind up looking too plain, like maybe Blue Sky Alpaca’s beautiful Metalico in Silver.

Every knitter should know how to turn a body part measurement and a stitch count (taken from a gauge swatch) into a cast-on count, and this is a perfect place to start. For the true beginners: If you haven’t already, you’ll need to learn to knit in the round on a circular needle (which you can do from this little video, and which will change your life). You’ll just knit every stitch, around and around and around. And by the time you start getting bored with that, it will be time for you to learn the most basic of decreases, which is simply to knit two stitches together (aka “k2tog”). And, once you’ve got too few stitches to stretch around your circular, you get to try your hand at double-pointed needles. All incredibly valuable, foundational skills, acquired one at a time, and at the end, an awesome hat!

Meanwhile, check out Vanessa’s recommendations for recreating the rest of Emily’s look.

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission