Knit the Look: Slouchy sweater perfection

Knit the Look: Slouchy sweater perfection

Here’s another take on the slouchy off-white sweater to pair with everything, this time spotted on an unidentified beauty in Paris. We don’t know the girl’s nationality, but her outfit is classic all-American with a twist. The sweater itself is dead simple, and could be easily improvised from the top down (in any weight you like) in seed stitch or waffle stitch or whatever your heart desires. Or if you want a pattern, I’d go with Heidi Kirrmaier’s Such a Winter’s Day. To get the look of the street-style pullover, knit it quite oversized — maybe 9 or 10 inches of ease. Leave a long side slit and work a few inches of ribbing at the hem on the front and back. And when you pick up the neck stitches, pick up a few fewer than recommended and knit two inches of ribbing instead of the prescribed funnel neck. For yarn, any off-white worsted would do, but the one on my mind is the one in my hands right now — Quince and Co’s Lark in Egret.

See Vanessa’s original post for the full-length look.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Elisabeth Erm’s everyday everywhere sweater

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Elisabeth Erm’s everyday everywhere sweater

Knit the Look: Elisabeth Erm's everyday everywhere sweater

This is two Looks in a row featuring a statement mini paired with an ultra-basic slouchy sweater. In the case of this Elisabeth Erm ensemble, it’s more of a summer-into-fall sort of pullover — drop-shouldered, long-sleeved, thin but warm. The sort of sweater you think of as your weekend sweater but you actually would happily wear seven days a week, for as much of the year as you can get away with, layered over everything from your best shirt to your nightshirt. The trouble with oversized sweaters is it’s a fine line between slouchy and sloppy. Wearing men’s sweaters isn’t really the answer. Which is why I love Jared Flood’s Agnes as the recommended pattern for this — slouchy and drop-shouldered but with all the necessary proportioning to keep you from drowning in it. The only difference between it and Elisabeth’s sweater is the edging. Knit a long ribbed hem (elongating the sweater in the process), ribbed cuffs and a ribbed neckband — and, of course, skip the stripes in this case — and voilà! If you like it tweedy, go with Brooklyn Tweed Loft in Fossil. Or for a really luxurious, pure ivory version, knit it in Woolfolk Tynd in color 01.

See Vanessa’s post for more shots of the sweater and Elisabeth’s most excellent sneakers.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Kia Low’s perfect summer sweater

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Kia Low’s perfect summer sweater

Knit the Look: Kia Low's perfect summer sweater

Not many of us can pull off a gold lamé mini and Rodarte runway eyebrow “makeup,” but this slouchy little black sweater seen on model Kia Low is just the sort of staple we should all have in our closets. It strikes me as a classic Julie Hoover sort of thing, and sure enough she’s got just the pattern: Marly. All you need to do to make it a little more like Kia’s is knit an extra inch or two on the sleeve length.

Black yarn isn’t the easiest thing to come by, and Marly is written for Serena, an alpaca-cotton blend in sport weight, which makes this one extra tricky on the substitution front. (Unless, of course, you want to knit it one of Serena’s colors!) I asked Julie what she’d recommend and, interestingly, she thought of Shibui’s Twig and Pebble held together, which is the exact combo I was just swatching. Marly’s gauge is 23 sts and 32 rows over 4 inches. My swatch in those two yarns held double on US8s was 23 sts and 30 rows. So one could very likely get Marly’s gauge with a US7 or US8 needle and those two yarns, both of which come in the deliciously black Abyss. Or, as Julie points out, Shibui has a number of lace- or fingering-weight yarns that could be combined for this sweater in a variety of fabrics — Twig + Pebble, Linen + Silk Cloud, Cima + Linen. You’d just need the designated Marly yardage in each of the two yarns. And please send the sweater to me when you’re done with it!

See Vanessa’s original post for additional shots of Kia’s outfit.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Elin Kling’s spring shell

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Elin Kling’s spring shell

Knit the Look: Elin Kling's spring shell

Although it troubles me that people wear jeans to Fashion Week these days, I am in love with this outfit of Elin Kling’s — a classic, gossamer, ivory shell paired with funky jeans and black stilettos. Simple perfection, and a great way to get to wear a sweater in spring or fall. When I saw it, the first sweater pattern that sprang to mind was Evening Calm, from the current issue of Amirisu, because I am more than a little obsessed with it. It’s a bit more textured than Elin’s sweater, with the central cables, but would look phenomenal worn this way. Instead of pure wool, though, I might suggest knitting it in a wool-cotton blend, such as the amazing Bomuld og Uld from Geilsk, in natural.

Check out Vanessa’s original post for more shots of this outfit.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Natalie Joos’ charcoal cap

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Natalie Joos’ charcoal cap

Knit the Look: Natalie Joos' charcoal cap

I find Tales of Endearment blogger Natalie Joos impossibly adorable, but this also happens to be one of my all-time favorite photos from Vanessa’s blog — Natalie in a subdued-yet-rule-breaking, season-spanning combo of a white skirt, incredible wool toggle coat and charcoal grey beanie. It’s an outfit that says she sees the light of Spring at the end of Winter’s tunnel. But mostly I just really love that hat. Neither of the two photos tells us anything concrete about what’s actually going on with it, knitwise, other than that it’s a bulky yarn knitted with a bit of purl texture on the body. I’m thinking all we’d need do to get the same effect is tamper with Audrey’s stitch counts and knit it in Quince and Co’s Puffin in Kittywake.

And now that I’ve typed that, I won’t be able to avoid doing it.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Multi-marl infinity scarf

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Multi-marl infinity scarf

Knit the Look: Multi-marl infinity scarf

Not long ago, in one of my favorite installments of Knit the Look, I recommended adapting Stephen West’s free Ferocious Briocheous cowl pattern to knit a rich, cushy, all-black scarf. Today instead of paring that pattern down, I’m suggesting ramping it up! I love the multi-marl infinity scarf on this unidentified beauty, and again it’s Stephen’s pattern to the rescue. The pattern is written for fingering-weight yarn, while this scarf is much chunkier and marled. So we can kill two birds with one stone by holding the yarn double and casting on roughly half the stitches specified in the pattern. (Do a swatch to figure out the right needle size for this — US8, perhaps? — and what the stitch gauge works out to be, so you can multiply that by your desired width.) To get the mixed marl effect, knit most of the scarf holding one strand of charcoal with one strand of ivory, then swap out the charcoal for a bit and hold two strands of ivory, then hold one ivory and one red, and back to two ivory. I used luxurious Road to China Light in Hematite, Riverstone and Ruby for the photos, but these are easy enough colors to approximate that any neck-friendly fingering-weight wool would do. Or if you want it even chunkier, hold two strands of worsted!

See Vanessa Jackman’s original post for another shot of this gorgeous girl and her gorgeous cowl.

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UNRELATED: The Wabi Mitts kits were restocked on Friday and announced to the shop mailing list over the weekend (are you on the list?) so the stock is a bit depleted again, but there are still four colors available at the moment! More on the way …

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Preetma Singh’s rollneck sweater

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

Knit the Look: Preetma Singh’s rollneck sweater

Knit the Look: Preetma Singh's rollneck sweater

I can never see a rollneck sweater and not think of the J.Crew classic from my youth, which I coveted for all the years they kept it in the catalog and never got to have. Seeing this version on fashion editor/drummer Preetma Singh makes me want one all over again. As did the Purl Soho Pullover pattern when it was released last year. Preetma’s has ribbed cuffs, which I love and would be a no-brainer of a mod, and a punkified hem. I personally would skip that part, but you could easily emulate it with a crochet chain. Knit it in Purl Soho’s Worsted Twist Heather in the lightly mottled Ash Gray. Or — if you’re comfortable adapting a pattern to a different gauge — you could get a chunkier and more marled look like Preetma’s by holding together two strands of a fingering-weight yarn, one in light grey and the other an even lighter grey.

See Vanessa’s post for more of Preetma’s look.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Danielle Bernstein’s cable beanie

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission