WIP of the Week, week 3 (plus new buttons!)

WIP of the Week, week 3 (plus new buttons!)

Oh, you guys, it was SO HARD to pick a #fringeandfriendsknitalong WIP of the Week this week. I wish I had at least four prizes to give out, and I’m certain it’s going to keep getting harder every week. But in the end, I decided this week’s prize goes to Catherine Wendland, who goes by “wendlandcd” both on Instagram and on Ravelry. Catherine’s Amanda has become a Flat Stanley of sorts, and I’ve been enjoying seeing it at the hardware store and on a city bench and, in the case of the above photo, at what does appear to be a very lovely park. So Catherine, you’ve won a $150 gift certificate to the brand new Fancy Tiger Crafts online store! Please let me know how we can get in touch with you about redeeming your prize.

Congratulations to Catherine and to the wonderful Fancy Tiger ladies on the launch of their beautiful new site! (Make sure you update your bookmark or RSS for their blog, by the way.)

I want to make sure everyone knows how to see all of the amazing sweaters that are happening as part of this knitalong. Photos are mainly appearing at Instagram and Ravelry. If you’re in the Instagram app, you can search on the hashtag #fringeandfriendsknitalong. Otherwise, it’s been brought to my attention that there are third-party websites that will allow you to see hashtagged Instagram pics (since their own website does not), e.g. Websta. (It ain’t a pretty page, but at least you can see the pics.) And for Ravelry, you can see all of the tagged project pages right here. If you’re blogging about your WIP, please remember to link to it from the comments here!

Keep those photos comin’! There’s another awesome prize to be awarded next Friday.

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NEW! Buttons worty of your handmade garments

In Fringe Supply Co. news, I have a bunch of buttons that have been patiently waiting for me to photograph and post them, so this week I picked out four varieties that happen to come in Amanda-appropriate sizes. I know none of us are anywhere near the buttonbands-and-buttons stage, but I love having buttons picked out in advance — it’s like the carrot on the end of that stick! Clockwise from top left, they are: concave cream bone, a beautiful tea-stained looking bone; soft concave corozo, in ivory, navy and black; concave horn disc in horn (obvs), bleached horn and extra-bleached horn; and narrow rim grommet corozo in navy, crimson, black and plum.

I’m thinking of pale buttons for my ivory Amanda, and am debating between the concave cream bone and the soft concave corozo in ivory, both of which would be gorgeous. But it would also be amazing with the contrast of the horn or the black with the gold grommets! Right? So many great choices.

And of course, lots of options there for all the other projects of the world, as well. I also received a few baskets this week — natural and patterned. And the cable needles are finally available in ebony again.

Have a stellar weekend everyone! I’m planning to get my clothes out of the suitcase finally, hopefully look for a couch, and then I shall KNIT!

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PREVIOUSLY in #fringeandfriendsknitalong: In pursuit of sleeve perfection

Next of the best of Spring 2015: Lace cardigans

Next of the best of Spring 2015: Lace cardigans

The Spring 2015 collections have been soooo mesmerizingly beautiful. If I hadn’t already sold or donated nearly everything I owned, I’d be inspired to do so now, and to start over with all sorts of pretty, girly things, like those seen at Chloé and Sea in particular. So I’ve loved looking at these shows — really, one of the best overall seasons in ages — despite their having been almost entirely devoid of knits. Sob! So tragic.

What few sweaters did appear have been forgettably basic, and maybe that’s why these two stood out from the, umm, crowd. But however you want to look at it, if you want to be on-trend sweater-wise for Spring, think in terms of a sweet lace cardigan, as seen at Michael Kors and A Détacher.

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IMPORTANT REMINDER: Tomorrow morning I’ll be announcing the third winner of our WIP of the Week for the #fringeandfriendsknitalong. So don’t forget to share you knits!

Elsewhere

Yarny links for your clicking pleasure

Before I get into this latest batch of tasty links, I just want to say I know I’ve been pretty tight-lipped about our move and how things are going in Nashville. I put up a little post about it on Instagram last night, for anyone who’s interested.

Now! Let’s get to the important stuff—

— Did you know it’s UK Wool Week / Shetland Wool Week? I, for one, am wishing I was at the Knitting and Stitching Show.

— Related: Melody at Mandarine’s is hosting a knitalong of the beautiful (and free) Shwook Hat, the official pattern of Shetland Wool Week.

— Semi-related: Entrancing video by Kathy Cadigan for Gudrun Johnston’s lovely new pattern collection, The Shetland Trader Book 2

— Very very tangentially related: I would like this deluxe reproduction of Weldon’s Practical Needlework from Victorian England, please.

— Unrelated, but related to you know what: Anna pointed me to this One Jumper Project. Marvelous.

— Cable-licious: Loved seeing Bristol Ivy’s charts and creative process for her Maeve cardigan at the Kelbourne blog.

— And in case you haven’t heard, the Mason-Dixon ladies are blogging again. Hooray! I was blown away by Ann Shayne’s post that kicked it back off, Poverty and Luxury. So good.

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In pursuit of sleeve perfection

In pursuit of sleeve perfection

So, sleeves! First let’s recap what our illustrious and industrious panel is doing here, since there are few people switching teams during the sleeve portion of the #fringeandfriendsknitalong, and I think this is interesting:

Team Seamed Sleeves: Kate, Anna, Rebekka, Amy, Meg, me
Team Seamless Sleeves: Jaime

As Jaime said, “What the heck?” I really thought more people would opt to do the sleeves seamlessly. For me the only argument against is that, with all the cabling, I feel like it’ll be faster to knit them flat and seam than it would be to do them in the round. So I might as well have the benefit of that seam.

I also want to point out in Amy’s sweet photo of her sunbathing sleeves up there (love that project bag!) that although it looks like she’s knitting both sleeves on one long needle, she’s technically not. But she is knitting them simultaneously. If you have Second Sleeve Syndrome, it’s something to think about. You can do like Amy, or even just cast on both sleeves on the same long needle — you’ll be working two pieces of fabric from two balls — and work those sleeves side-by side. That way you finish them both at once and can be utterly certain that you increased on all the same rows and so on. I’ve never done it before but am definitely planning to do it here.

Apart from that, there are three things I want to discuss about sleeves today:

1) PATTERN PLACEMENT

There were a couple of people asking in comments way back about whether the sleeves needed to end on the same chart row as the fronts and back. I mistakenly answered that it didn’t matter, I guess thinking for a brief moment that this was a set-in sleeve sweater or something. Because this yoke is joined in one piece at the underarms and worked seamlessly upward from there, you will want to be on the same row of the chart when you join all the pieces. That way your honeycomb will line up and you won’t have to keep track of being on different rows in different charts.

There have also been questions from people about how to know where to stop with the sleeves if you’ve done them first, since the pattern instructs you to end at the same chart row as the back. Regardless of whether you start with the body or sleeves, my best advice is think of it as tentative. Put your stitches on waste yarn and know that you might need to adjust one or the other upward or downward. For me, the sleeve length is more critical than the body length — I want that sleeve to hit me exactly at the top of my hand, whereas I have less precise wishes for the body length. It just needs to be in the right neighborhood. So even though I’ve started with the body, I’ll knit my sleeves to where I want them and then adjust my body pieces to match that spot. You may do whichever makes the most sense to you.

2) SLEEVE LENGTH

This is a soapbox of mine. I’ve touched on it in the row gauge post and elsewhere, but want to say again that where your final sleeve cuff hits you is a function of sleeve length (meaning, how far you knit before the underarm shaping) plus armhole depth. The sleeve length given in the pattern may or may not be right for you. With your arm hanging straight down, have someone measure from the top of your shoulder to your wrist. Then take a look at the armhole depth in the pattern schematic. Let’s say your desired shoulder-to-wrist length is 23″. And let’s say the pattern’s armhole depth is meant to be 7.25″ of that. That means your sleeve needs to be 15.75″ from cast-on to underarm. BUT, that’s also assuming your row gauge matches the pattern gauge, which is the only way your yoke dimension will match the schematic dimension. If your row gauge is 10% bigger, your yoke will be 10% longer, making your armhole depth 8″. If you attach that same 15.75″ sleeve to it, you now have a total sleeve length of 23.75″, almost an inch longer than you wanted it. And if you had knitted the 17.25″ sleeve the pattern calls for, your sleeve would now be hanging halfway down your hand. So if you’re picky about sleeves, pay close attention to all of your measurements. And maybe re-read that row gauge post.

3) INCREASING IN PATTERN

Many have asked about this, and here again I’m going to hand the microphone to Kate Gagnon Osborn. Take it away, Kate—

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For ease of space (as more space = more cost), it is industry standard to not chart out a full sleeve and, instead, instruct the knitter to “… work sts in patt as number of sts permits …,” but how do you “increase in pattern” exactly?

As you’re increasing, you will actually be working stitches in stockinette until you have enough stitches to work a full repeat of the stitch pattern. In the case of the Amanda sleeves, this means one cable cross, or a total of 4 stitches. Below, I’ve charted the sleeve with 4 increases to show how this would look in your knitting.

NOTE: The edge stitch is not charted — always work the edge stitches (aka selvedge stitches) as written in the pattern. Also, only the right side of the sleeve is included below; the same rules apply to the left half of the sleeve. As this particular pattern has you begin to increase after a certain length on your sleeve (not at a certain row), you may find that you are working your increases on a different row of the chart than pictured. The process is the same, regardless of where your increases may fall.

How to increase in pattern

Increase #1: After working one increase, you have [a multiple of 4 stitches] + 1 in the honeycomb portion of your sleeve. You will work all of your honeycomb stitches as charted, and this newly increased stitch in stockinette stitch (knit on the right side, purl on the wrong side).

How to increase in pattern

Increase #2: After working two increases, you have [a multiple of 4 stitches] + 2 in the honeycomb portion of your sleeve. You will work all of your honeycomb stitches as charted, and your two extra stitches in stockinette stitch.

How to increase in pattern

Increase #3: After working three increases, you have [a multiple of 4 stitches] + 3 in the honeycomb portion of your sleeve. You will work all of your honeycomb stitches as charted, and your three extra stitches in stockinette stitch.

How to increase in pattern

Increase #4: This is where it gets fun! After working four total increases, you are back to a pure multiple of 4 in the honeycomb portion of your sleeve. You will continue to work all of your honeycomb stitches as charted, and the 4 increased stitches in stockinette, until you reach the next row with a cable cross. Then, you will work these 4 stitches in the cable cross, maintaining the alternating left/right leaning cable pattern when doing so. If, as in my sample chart, a cable cross occurs on the same row as your 4th increase, wait until the next cross to work it into your honeycomb pattern — so you’re not trying to increase and cable on the same stitch.

Simply continue in this way until you have worked all of your increases!
KGO

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Thanks again, Kate!

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PREVIOUSLY in #fringeandfriendsknitalong: WIP of the Week, week 2 (and other fun stuff)

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Photo © Amy Christoffers, charts © Kate Gagnon Osborn; used with permission

New Favorites: the Woolfolk collection

New Favorites: the Woolfolk debut collection

I promise we’re going to talk about sleeves this week, all of you following the whole #fringeandfriendsknitalong series, but home life took precedence over knitting this weekend so I don’t quite have that together yet. Which is good, because it gives me a minute to publicly drool over these new patterns. Kristin Ford has been a big cheerleader for Fringe for some time, and I’m so thrilled to be able to shout about her new yarn company, Woolfolk. (Named for her grandmother, Katherine Woolfolk — is that too wonderful for words, or what?) I got a sneak peek at the yarns in May — have had a gorgeous little canister of them sitting on my desk ever since — and this weekend it all went live with the launch of the debut pattern collection, which Kristin smartly enlisted Olga Buraya-Kefelian to design. Kristin is a former architect with a taste for clean lines and smart construction, and I’ve been known to describe Olga as “our foremost knitting engineer.” It’s kind of a match made in heaven. I wasn’t privy to the creative brief or anything, but Olga put together a capsule wardrobe of knits — eight understated but flawlessly detailed pieces — and it’s been beautifully styled and shot. I’m blown away by it. These four I can’t live without:

TOP LEFT: Flet is just a perfectly shaped raglan turtleneck with chained ribbing and a stand-up collar (and I’ll take the pants and shoes too, please)

TOP RIGHT: Fure is a simple pair of ribbed mitts (which you know I can’t get enough of) made irresistible by their length, suppleness and fold-back top

BOTTOM LEFT: Vinkler is the scarf I want for winter, plain and simple — love what the geometry of the stitch pattern does for the edge of the fabric

BOTTOM RIGHT: Knop, likewise, is exactly the shape I want a hat to be, with the added panache of that shaped front brim (I definitely prefer it in the front!) and gorgeous use of fisherman’s rib

You can see the whole collection on Ravelry and find out more about the exquisite yarns at Woolfolkyarn.com. Congratulations, K&O — amazing.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: the City Cape

WIP of the Week (and other fun stuff)

WIP of the Week, week 2 — #fringeandfriendsknitalong

Last week, the knitter known as “waldorfmanufaktur” (on Instagram, Ravelry and Flickr) was a veerrrry close runner-up for the #fringeandfriendsknitalong WIP of the Week. I was crazy in love with her simple, beautifully lit photo of her swatch for Ondawa. But this week you might say she wins the prize for sheer enthusiasm. She is working on two sweaters and a scarf all at once! All cable-y goodness, and all of them promising to be gorgeous. (Specifically: Amanda, Ondawa and Guilder.) Congratulations, Simone, you’ve won a prize package from Kelbourne Woolens including a cable-print project bag, knit check and keychain knit check, and three skeins of Knightsbridge in the color Black Pool.

Keep those photos coming, friends — next week is another killer prize! And I have to say, while this week’s winner didn’t wind up coming from that pool, I loved all the shots of what you’re doing, listening to, and drinking while knitting — including the multiple Amandas at the beach. So plenty more of those, please! (By the way, Kate helped me figure out how to see all the tagged photos on Ravelry — if you tag your project page fringeandfriendsknitalong we’ll all be able to see it in the tag search results, seen here. Really wish web users could see the hashtag results on Instagram — it is an awesome sight to behold: over 200 photos and counting.)

IN OTHER NEWS: There’s a little interview with yours truly on the Madesmith blog about Fringe Supply Co. and how it came to be. (I swear I got my hair cut since then! Blame that rat’s nest on the move. And the heat.) And speaking of Fringe Supply Co., another big bunch of your favorite things got restocked this week: Cable Fashion Drama and Macrame Pattern Book, repair hooks, bone DPNs, rosewood crochet hooks, bonsai scissors and a bunch of sizes/colors of bento bags. Go get ’em.

Happy knitting this weekend!

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PREVIOUSLY in #fringeandfriendsknitalong: The secret to a truly great-fitting sweater

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DIY Elizabeth and James holey sweater

DIY Elizabeth and James holey sweater

This is the easiest DIY of all time. (No brain cells were killed in the making of this post.) Love this Elizabeth and James sweater? It won’t be available until Spring 2015, but you can knit yourself one in the meantime. All you need is Wool and the Gang’s Hole in One Sweater kit. The pattern is written for two strands of yarn held together, so there’s the opportunity for a marl effect. But if you like the white, just use two whites! And shorten up the cuffs a little bit. Easy peasy lemon squeezy, as they say.

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p.s. Don’t forget: Tomorrow is WIP of the Week day for the #fringeandfriendsknitalong, so show us your cables! This week’s prize comes from Kelbourne Woolens, hint hint.

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PREVIOUSLY in DIY: Vanessa Bruno turtleneck