Elsewhere

Elsewhere: Yarny links for your clicking pleasure

It’s been a while, I know, but here are some things I’ve been loving lately:

• Felicia on the most important lesson there is: learning to read your knitting. That is truly the point where everything changes, so if you don’t know how to read your work, go read every word. (See also her amazing quilt roundup, swoon)

• The incredible Nido has branched out; how amazing are these Telar textiles? (Did I learn to weave yet? I really am getting that Cricket Loom soon.)

Better living through yak down

Tara Hurst in a sweater her grandmother knitted in Emma’s Lovely Lady series. (I love Tara’s blog.)

• Coveting this simple tee

Amazeballs (thanks, G)

• Next year I’m going to the Scandinavian festival with Lori

• And in case anyone hasn’t seen it, this is your brain on knitting

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New Favorites: Bobble hats

New Favorites: Bobble hats

It’s raining bobble patterns. I had fun knitting the nupp rows on my Trillium (which I am THIS CLOSE to finishing) and between the last two months of sweater knitting and all the talk around here of smaller projects for the warmer months, I’m eager for hats. So much the better if they’re bobble hats, and this week the universe presented a few options:

Diode by Erica Smith is the restrained entry in the field. Relatively tiny sport-weight bobbles create an overall texture, and I love the doubled brim. York Bobble Toque* by Tara-Lynn Morrison is characteristically chunky but also written for aran weight — above is the chunky version pictured on her way-too-cool daughter. And last but far from least is Anna Maltz’s Archipelago. which I’ve been waiting for ever since she posted it on Instagram and was begged by many to write the pattern. Like everything Anna is involved with, it looks like a ton of fun.

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*pattern sent to me by the designer

Can we talk about this stitch pattern?

Can we talk about this Dries Van Noten stitch pattern?

You may have heard me talking before about how I go to my friend Leigh‘s once a month to eat and drink with a bunch of creative women, who all bring some kind of handcrafty thing to work on for the evening. Last week, my friend Liz showed up with some mending in tow, including this vintage Dries Van Noten sweater vest, which I promptly stole from her. (Temporarily! I’ll give it back.) (Probably.) (I mean, she knows where I live.)

It’s an argyle sweater vest, right? Except it’s Dries Van Noten’s take on an argyle sweater vest. It’s bright blue and grey on the bottom; grey, green and another blue up top. It has pink ribbing around the neck and armholes, and a zipper halfway up one side. It’s crazy and amazing, but can we talk about the stitch pattern? I honestly can’t figure out what’s going on here, especially with the sort of double-dashes that run across the diamonds and appear to be simply woven straight across the fabric. If you have thoughts on how any of it is done, please disclose below.

Can we talk about this Dries Van Noten stitch pattern?

SPEAKING OF CRAZY: I don’t know if it’s the end of tax season or what, but I’m in the mood to pack edibles into the Fringe Supply Co. shipments again! So from now through Sunday, all orders $30 and up (not including shipping) will come with a ginger cookie — my treat.

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Sweet spring shawls: Or, what to knit for Mother’s Day, part 2

Sweet spring shawls: Or, what to knit for Mother's Day, part 2

When I embarked on my roundup last week, it was going to be spring wraps (or shoulderwear, as I like to call it) — scarves, cowls and shawls. But I pulled too many good things to fit into one post. So here’s part two, the shawls!

1. Brisha by Cecily Glowik MacDonald, garter shawlette with a geometric lace border

2. Haiku Crochet Shawl by Rebecca Velasquez, previously noted, I know, but I’m just nuts about it

3. Imagine When by Joji Locatelli, asymmetic garter stitch with eyelets

4. Meadowgold by Romi Hill, pretty yet modern lace (See also: Sorority Shawl)

5. Spring Etude Shawl by Yuliya Tkacheva, well-done Tunisian crochet, be still my heart!

6. Qinnitan by Melanie Berg, who doesn’t love simple stripes?

7. Springtime Bandit by Kate Gagnon Osborn, a chunkier spot of lace (free pattern) (See also: Conifer)

8. Carnica by Robin Melanson, nice textured square with a not-too decorative border

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In case you missed it: Pretty spring scarves: Or, what to knit for Mother’s Day

 

New Favorites: everything Leila Raabe

New Favorites: everything Leila Raabe

I think of myself as a Leila Raabe fan. Her Peabody sweater and Ashby shawl, for instance, have been on my dream knits list since almost the day I learned how. Stasis is a perpetual candidate for casting on. Her name comes up here fairly often, I’m sure. And yet I must never have gone to look at her complete oeuvre before. (Don’t you hate that word?) Because how else did I not know about some of her best designs? Or maybe I looked long enough ago that my taste in knitting has changed? Who knows.

In the comments on Monday’s spring scarves roundup, Indiecita mentioned Thayer, above left, which is what prompted me to take another look. Once there I found Wexford, above right, which is equally lovely. Apart from the fall-ish photos, either of these would have been lovely additions on Monday. And look at Spire, below — another amazing square shawl/throw that should totally have factored into last week’s New Favorites, alongside her Tilt. Pay better attention, Karen!

Regardless, now it can be said: There is not a single, solitary thing on this page that I wouldn’t want to knit … and in fact I’m just mentally trying to sort them into what order.

New Favorites: everything Leila Raabe

Blog Crush: True Brit Knits

Blog Crush: True Brit Knits

One of my favorite blogs is nearly impossible to read, but I mean this strictly in a technical sense. True Brits Knits is Belinda Boaden and Wendy Baker, and you’ve no doubt seen multiple references to it/them here in the past. I love love love their blog, but can only get to their posts by way of a feed reader, or a permalink posted on social media, or what have you. I don’t know what my glitch is, but I do know that persistence pays off! (And here’s the Bloglovin page from which you can get to the individual posts if the site itself isn’t working for you either.) ANYWAY! The point is, however you get to it, get to it. I love the mix of mood boards and trend watching and swatches and sketches, and all the playing around with scale and texture — so inspiring. And you never know what they might be getting up to with patterns. (Remember Pendleton?) Most recently it’s this tricked-out aran sweater, The Highland Bling, which I like to pretend they made with me in mind. If ever I were to wear sequins, they would have to be ironically crusted onto a fisherman sweater, right? Brilliant.

Blog Crush: True Brit Knits

SPEAKING OF AMAZING CABLES: To my immense astonishment (and gratitude!), the enormous stack of Cable Fashion Drama I had, which I thought would last awhile, is already down to a handful of copies. I’m hoping to be able to score some more of them, but at best we’ll be waiting for the slow boat again. Just so you know.

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Pretty spring scarves: Or, what to knit for Mother’s Day

Pretty spring scarves: Or, what to knit for Mother's Day

Whether you’re barely beginning to thaw out or already thinking about concerts in the park on a cool summer night, a lighter, leaner scarf might be just the thing to keep your knitting needles (and crochet hooks!) happy and your neck cozy in the weeks to come. Or your mother’s, for that matter — Mother’s Day is right around the bend:

 1. Kozue by Kirsten Johnstone, lace for minimalists

2. Spring Lace Infinity Scarf by Linda Thach, lovely mix of textures, knitted in linen (free pattern)

3. Trellis Scarf from the Purl Bee, nice transitional piece (free pattern)

4. Celes scarf by Jared Flood, full-on lace I could imagine wearing myself

5. Striped Cotton Cowl from the Purl Bee, how to make a cotton cowl fantastic (free pattern)

6. Claudia Scarf by Rebecca Jackson, an elegant slip of crochet (free pattern)

7. Spring Tuck by Rose Anne, love that strip of lace in the gossamer stockinette

8. Kelly’s Frothy Crocheted Scarf by Kelly Jahraus, super-simple single crochet on a big ol’ hook

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