New Favorites: Grille

New Favorites: Grille by Bonnie Sennott

As you likely heard, the ninth edition of Brooklyn Tweed’s Wool People hit the airwaves yesterday — a collection containing seven lace shawl patterns and seven sweater patterns. Were I a lace shawl person, I’d be casting on Loden ASAP. But I’m a sweater person, and the one here that makes my heart go pitty-pat is Grille by Bonnie Sennott. My love of the sweater vest is well-documented, as is my affinity for textural knit-purl patterns. So this oversized, sleeveless, crewneck number has my name written all over it.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Fair-weather friends

Idea Log: The pinstripe dress

Idea Log: The pinstripe dress

People often ask me where I get my ideas, and my answer is generally “I dunno.” They’re not often directly traceable, but they are usually the result of serendipity, I think — or paying attention to the signs. I thought it might be worthwhile to record them now and then, when they can be traced, so perhaps I don’t lose track of them and one or two might be brought to fruition! So here’s a little case study—

1) A few weeks ago I bought Butterick sewing pattern B6147 on a whim while ordering a different pattern for my sewing workshop. Didn’t have anything particular in mind at the time — I just know short-sleeved tops are a gaping hole in my wardrobe and this shape appeals to me. So it was an impulse buy.

2) While wandering around Imogene + Willie a couple of weeks later, it was brought to my attention that there were baskets of fabric bundles on the floor along one wall — remnants, presumably, in a variety of prints and stripes. When it became clear they were 5-yard cuts for $25, I snatched up one of each of all but one print. (There goes my no-fabric-stash vow.) Included was the ivory shirting with navy pinstripes above. Again, no particular plan in mind.

3) A couple of days after that, a Madewell email hit my inbox, and in it was a picture of this simple little pinstripe dress, which brought to mind that pattern and this fabric, and gave me the tangential idea of doing the short-sleeved version of B6147 (View C) at dress length, minus the elbow embellishments from either of the two reference points. And/or of making a similarly simple dress with this fabric and turning it cross-wise on the yoke.

Will it happen? I don’t know. But at least now it’s a butterfly with a pin in it.

 

First of the Best of Resort 2016: Tory Burch’s textiles

Best of the Best Knits of Resort 2016: Tory Burch

Tory Burch’s Resort 2016 collection is a bit of an odd mish-mash of girly florals and Southwest-ish motifs, but the high points are so high. Namely, the kachina doll necklace and shoes, and the two textile-riffic outfits above. It’s hard to imagine that vest with the tassels and fringe not winding up as my Best of the Best for this season, but I’m also crazy for the black-and-ivory pullover with that incredible woven skirt.

One of my personal goals for Slow Fashion October is to sew something from fabric woven by my friend Allison, and this gets my mind racing.

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PREVIOUSLY: Best of Fall 2015

Elsewhere

Yarny links for your clicking pleasure

Hey, thanks for the all the love for yesterday’s new Hatalong pattern, Hermaness Worsted! It’s been really fun to watch all the downloads and see it climbing the Hot Right Now page at Ravelry. If you haven’t already faved or queued it over there, the pattern page is right here.

Meanwhile, Elsewhere:

Can fashion be fast and sustainable? (thx, Lori D)

Awesome clothesline basket tutorial

@chiliphilly

— New fantasy yarn shopping destination is Avril in Japan thanks to random successive visits by @vic_pemberton and @keristk

— Also fantasizing about the beautiful new linen fabrics from Purl Soho

— Does everyone know about Fibreshare? (thx, Nutmeg)

— Must-watch #1: Miss Wool of America, 1965

— And Must-watch #2: Yarn 101 (did you sign up for that CreativeBug membership the other day?)

ALSO: Summer Solstice is my favorite day of the year, and to me summer and magazines go hand in hand, so from now through Sunday night, all in-stock Books & Magazines are 15% off with the code MAGADDICT at Fringe Supply Co. Happy stocking up, and happy weekend!

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PREVIOUSLY in Elsewhere

New Favorites: Fair-weather friends

New Favorites: Fair-weather friends

Summer has arrived in full force, after a really lovely and long Spring and pre-Summer, as I’ve been calling it. Which means the air conditioners of Nashville are all officially on full blast, my sinuses are on the fritz (TMI, I know), and all I can think about is how to keep my neck warm. These pale beauties are both calling out to me:

TOP: The Purl Bee’s Crosshatch Cowl is as spare and simple as it gets — and would make the perfect constant companion (free pattern)

BOTTOM: The Bonnie Banks Shawl has flirted with me twice in my inbox — first in a link from a Clara Parkes email about the yarn, then in an email from the designer, Beatrice Perron Dahlen, who had kindly sent me the pattern after I’d favorited it at Ravelry. I’ve sworn off shawl knitting, of course, but this one is mighty tempting.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Crochet temptations

Free learning!

Free learning!

There’s something else I learned this weekend that I want to pass along, which is that CreativeBug is free for 30 days right now. (This is not in any way a sponsored post. There are none of those here.) CreativeBug and Craftsy are two very deep rabbit holes I’ve so far avoided falling into, but I’ve been especially tempted lately when my friends Jaime and Amber (of Fancy Tiger) have mentioned their latest CreativeBug classes, on both knitting and sewing. During the course of Liesl’s workshop this weekend, she also mentioned several times “by the way, I have a CreativeBug video on [whatever the topic might have been] if you need a refresher,” which really drove home the utility of it. And then one of my classmates mentioned that it’s free right now. Not the “give us your credit card and we’ll start billing you in 30 days” kind of free; the “create a login and start watching all you like” kind of free. There’s a link and code on Liesl’s blog. It looks like the code is good through June 30th and your 30 days start at the time that you use it. (As opposed to its expiring on June 30th. Hope I’m right about that.) And yes, I already fell in. Major binge fest coming up!

Hatalong No. 3 PREVIEW

Fringe Hatalong No. 3 PREVIEW

Hooray, it’s getting to be time for another Fringe Hatalong! I’m teasing you today, of course, but this time I’m being a little more revealing than before — by showing you my Actual Swatch in advance of the pattern reveal. (If you recognize it, please keep it under your, uh, hat!) I will say that a swatch does not do justice to the finished hat — it is a truly gorgeous hat — but I wanted to give you a heads-up that it’s lace this time! My kind of lace, though, nothing frilly or fancy. Just a nice, tasty Shetland stitch that’s infinitely simpler than it looks. And it’s also charted — but it is a tiny, very simple chart, and I am going to walk you through it. It’s only 8 stitches wide and with just three different non-complicated stitch combinations, and you will see that it is totally doable even for advanced beginners. (If you’ve knitted lace before, you’ll be able to do this one in your sleep.)

All lace means is fabric with strategically placed holes in it, and all you do to make a hole is a yarnover — just wrap the yarn around the needle. If you’re a newer knitter, chances are you’ve done that lots of times unintentionally! This time we’ll do it intentionally, according to the aforementioned chart. So this will be a wing-stretcher for some of you, but how better to learn charts and lace than with a really simple project in the company of lots of helpful friends? Go ahead, dip that toe in the water!

I’ll post the pattern and kick things off next Thursday, June 18th! So be ready.

Recommended yarn: The pattern is written for Brooklyn Tweed’s worsted-weight Shelter. I will tell you that the sample is knitted in Sweatshirt, that perfect grey, and a lot of you are going to want yours to be exactly like the sample. It is so good. Shelter is available at all of these lovely stores as well as directly from BT’s website. You will need 1 skein if you don’t intend to swatch. If you do want to swatch (and I recommend you do), pick up a second skein. The hat uses 45 of the skein’s 50 grams (126 of the 140 yards in a skein). Shelter will be an especially good choice for anyone who’s nervous about this — it’s a “sticky” yarn which means if you do have any trouble and need to do a little ripping or repairing, you can feel good about the stitches staying put even when you slide them off your needle.

Suggested substitutions: If for whatever reason you won’t be using Shelter, some good tweedy worsted alternatives would be Quince and Co Owl, Harrisville Highland and Cascade 220 Heathers. For a non-tweed in a solid or semi-solid color try Quince and Co Lark, or Sincere Sheep Bannock (or her new Cormo Worsted!), or any of the hundreds of great worsted-weight yarns out there with good stitch definition (i.e. a nice multi-ply yarn). Again, you need approximately 126 yards for the hat, so if you want to swatch, make sure you’re buying enough to cover that. Many worsteds come in 220-ish yard skeins, so you’ll have plenty to work with in that case.

(If you plan to donate your hat to any of the chemo patient charities, remember to use a really, really soft yarn.)

Are you excited? I seriously can hardly wait to get started on this one. Big reveal right here next Thursday.

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PREVIOUSLY in the Fringe Hatalong Series: No. 1 – Audrey and No. 2 – L’Arbre