Knit the Look: Vasilisa Pavlova’s waffle sweater

Knit the Look: Vasilisa Pavlova's waffle sweater

Knit the Look is hard in the summer, but we’re all ready to dream about “transitional looks” right about now, am I right? I love the simplicity of this outfit on Vasilisa Pavlova: a beautifully proportioned waffle-stitch sweater in ivory paired with a black mini. (For me, that would be shorts.) Tahki Stacy Charles has a free pattern that’s a good starting point here, the Biella Pullover. To make it look like Vasilisa’s, knit a size with 6 or 8 inches of positive ease. For the body, start with 6 or 7 inches of ribbing, then skip the waist shaping and knit another 7 or 8 inches in the waffle pattern (depending on how long you want the body of your sweater to be — the slightly short length is key here). Same thing for the sleeves — knit a nice long ribbed cuff before starting in on the waffle work. Wear with everything you own.

For the rest of the outfit, see Vanessa’s original post.

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PREVIOUSLY in Knit the Look: Or, make that crochet?

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Street style photo © Vanessa Jackman; used with permission

 

Fancy ladies in Estonia

Fancy ladies in Estonia

In the category of Instagram feeds I wish I could beam myself into, the most recent additions are those of @fancyjaime and @fancyamber, the co-owners of Denver’s Fancy Tiger Crafts. If you already follow them, you know they’re perpetually off on some yarn-related adventure or another, but this most recent one takes the cake. They popped into Iceland for a minute on their way to Estonia, where they attended the sort of craft camp where you learn to carve bone tools as well as knit intricately patterned mittens. The photos have been totally amazing, but they’ll be pushed down-feed by their next adventure soon, so go look right now: @fancyjaime and @fancyamber. And/or read all about it next Monday on their blog.

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New Favorites: Summertastic wash cloths

New Favorites: Summertastic wash cloths

Do you know I have never knitted a wash cloth? It’s such a classic thing to knit by the dozens — and such a common starter project — but I don’t really use wash cloths, so it’s never really interested me. But suddenly it’s on my mind. In part because of this great new Purl Bee pattern, Washcloths and scrubbing mitt, and in part because I’m having a “coming full circle” moment over here. Bob and I are currently staying with our dear friends in Nashville, the dynamic brother-sister duo of Meg and DG. Meg (of KnitKnotes fame*) is the one who taught me to knit when we were visiting them in 2011. When I went to see her at Haus of Yarn before flying home, I bought a booklet of wash cloth patterns, thinking that would be a good learning tool, but then there was that whole wash cloth disinterest thing, so I never did it. Now here we are again and Meg just recently taught DG to knit. And what is he knitting in front of me each night? Not just wash cloths, no. He started out knitting these 50 states wash cloths (he’s cuckoo for map stuff) and promptly decided to knit them into a blanket. Maybe it’s that, maybe it’s watching my friend Leigh knit so many Grandmother’s Favorites over the last couple of years; maybe it’s the inherent logic of knitting small, quick, cotton things in the summer heat. Whatever the reason, wash cloths (and their upsized friends, the dish towels) are feeling super appealing to me right now, so I consulted my favorite patterns and it turns out they’re all from my friends over at the Purl Bee — i.e., all of them free:

TOP LEFT: Soft Cotton Knit Dishtowels — mmmm, garter stripes

TOP RIGHT: Washcloths and Scrubbing Mitt — fantastic use of that crazy Habu yarn

BOTTOM LEFT: Slip Stitch Dishtowels — you know I’m intrigued by that slip-stitch colorwork action (see also)

BOTTOM RIGHT: New Log Cabin Washcloths — I’ve also never knitted a mitered square (quelle horreur!)

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Martin Storey’s mega cables

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*DG did the design work on the KnitKnotes, by the way. Told you they’re a dynamic duo.

Elsewhere

Yarny links for your clicking pleasure

Elsewhere is exactly where I am these days, y’all. (I have free license to say y’all as much as I want now, so watch out!) My life is as disrupted as it can possibly get — and instead of getting more settled, it keeps finding ways to get more unsettled. But I am GOING WITH THE FLOW. Let’s just say I’m getting really good at shipping orders from the back of my car. Next week though (knock wood knock wood knock wood) I will finally have access to my new studio, so at least there will be some partial new normal to come, and hopefully a return to regular blogging. Meanwhile, fibery links for you to explore:

— Sarai Mitnick on why it’s ok to be a selfish sewer (or knitter!)

— “I love it because it was knitted by hand and with love. Its imperfections make it special and they make it mine. They make it better than all of my straight, even, normal-necked knitwear.

A mystery knit-along I would not have regretted. (Mystery knit-alongs scare me.)

— Jared Flood on color theory for knitters, Part 1 and Part 2

— I’m wowed by what all got made after Fancy Tiger’s Indigo Dye Day

Love this tote pattern

— and I’d like to visit the Voss Folkemuseum, please.

Have a marvelous weekend — please tell me what you’re working on so I can live (i.e, knit) vicariously! And p.s. for those who’ve been waiting, I just added some more copies of Macramé Pattern Book to the shop.

New Favorites: Martin Storey’s mega cables

New Favorites: Martin Storey's mega cables

If it’s anywhere near as hot where you are as it is where I am (hooray, we finally made it to Nashville!) this photo might make you recoil. But this is one of my favorite things I saw at the trade show in May, and I’m happy to see the pattern is now published. It’s Brecon by Martin Storey and it’s somewhere between a poncho and a cardigan, which I would expect to hate, but I love it. Or at least I remember loving it. Based on my reaction to it at the time, I feel certain I’ll be longing to knit and wear it once the temperature starts to dip. But it is kind of hard to imagine at the moment.

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SPEAKING OF MY MOVE, things continue to not go as planned (which I guess I should have expected) so shipping is going to continue to be not-quite-daily for the time being. I’ve got a note at the top of the webshop about next projected ship date(s) and will keep that up for as long as it’s sporadic. Back to normal soon! (Or else somebody please shoot me.) But thank you to everyone for your patience in the meantime.

New Favorites: Cable-ish socks

New Favorites: Cable-ish socks

I never did knit that cable-hat palate cleanser I was on about last month. But I still have a yearning for cables (I always have a yearning for cables) and am reminded of my goal to knit at least one pair of socks this summer. Ergo, cable socks — or at least cable-ish socks — are my new fixation:

LEFT: The Planorbis Corneus Socks by Hunter Hammersen are actually lace stitches that look a bit like basic cables (free pattern)

RIGHT: The Cross-Rib Socks by Ann Budd are cable stitches that look more like gothic cathedral architecture than traditional cables

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: In my size, please

Blog Crush: Lori Times Five

Blog Crush: Lori Times Five

Have you heard about this Shetland trip that Mary Jane Mucklestone and Gudrun Johnston are leading next month? I have the pleasure of knowing both of them — have taken classes with both — and got to hang out with Gudrun a bit at Squam last month, and they are truly remarkable people and teachers. Plus: Sheltland! So it’s killing me not to be able to go on this trip. But what’s making it even worse is that the people who are going are some of my favorite and most admired knitters. Those I’m aware of include Kathy Cadigan and Nicole Dupuis (both former Our Tools, Ourselves profilees, as you’ll see from those links); Claire Dupont, who is a favorite of mine on both Ravelry and Instagram (and who has a standing invitation to Our Tools); and Lori Ann Graham from one of my favorite knitterly blogs, Lori Times Five. That’s her above, in the Bressay dress and Hansel shawl she knitted for the trip — both designs of Gudrun’s. (Bressay is from Mary Jane’s book Fair Isle Style.) “Zest for life” is not a phrase I use a lot, but it’s what springs to mind when I think about Lori and her long, photo-filled posts about her latest adventures — be they hiking or knitting or hitting up a festival or flea market somewhere in the world. I so admire her exuberance, and love her theory that “the longer an item takes to make, the more photographs it gets.” At least those of us who can’t go to Shetland — at least not this time! — will get to see Lori’s version. (And I imagine Nicole will blog about it as well.)

I’m also counting on all of these women to be posting copiously on Instagram: @mjmucklestone, @gudrunjohnston, @kathycad, @clairedupont @loritimesfive. If anyone reading this is also going, please point me to your online self!

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PREVIOUSLY in Blog Crush: Coletterie