Elsewhere

Yarny links for your clicking pleasure

The only thing harder than Mondays are Mondays following holiday weekends. Hopefully you had a really terrific time this weekend celebrating the 4th with friends and family (if you’re in the US), ate your body weight in hot dogs (no matter where you are), drank a few adult beverages (assuming you’re of adult-beverage age), and right about now you’re in the mood to procrastinate whatever it is you’re supposed to be doing. Well, Elsewhere is here to help!

– Umm, me on the A Playful Day podcast (Disclaimer: I am not very articulate at 8:00 in the morning. Please replace the word “intrinsically” with “implicitly” and make kind allowances for assorted other offenses against the English language. Also I have no idea why I was talking about Cambodia. Still: hopefully worth a little listen.)

#crochetsummer2015 is alive

– What do you get when John Oliver tackles the subject of fast fashion? 17 pretty hilarious minutes (via Liesl)

Meeting a Japanese indigo master

– I feel like at any given time there are at least three people in my IG feed posting pics from Iceland, but @jennytrygg has really been hitting it out of the park (see her hashtag #davidandjennyseeiceland)

– Super fun to stumble across the Yarn Pyramid in a post on sfgirlbybay the other night (in an unattributed photo of Lisa Garcia’s studio)

– And hey, are any of you attending the SSK retreat? We’ll have a Fringe Supply Co. booth in the marketplace on the 18th, a week from Saturday. Pretty sure the market is open to the public, so if you’re in the Nashville area, make a note!

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PREVIOUSLY in Elsewhere

Begging your pardon

Soooo, the thrilling event I alluded to the other day is that we’ve been shopping for a house and appear to have found one! By which I mean we put in an offer the other night and it was accepted. Now — after stressful weeks of endless phone calls and emails and documents downloaded and uploaded and faxed and contested (followed by the sad march through a dozen wrong houses before finding the right one) — the really hectic part begins. If you’ve ever bought a house before, you know it’s a full-time job, and with Fringe Association and Fringe Supply Co., I already have two full-time jobs on my hands. So this is me giving fair notice that blogging might not be daily for the next few weeks. A day without blogging is, for me, like a day without air so hopefully any gaps will be few and far between. But I hope you’ll understand if I’m not here every single weekday like usual — at least until the crashing waves of e-docs have ebbed and the inspectors have tendered their reports.

For now I’m wishing a safe and sparkly 4th of July to those of you in the US, and a very happy weekend to the rest of you! I WILL see you next week—

(Fringe Supply‘s famously speedy shipping will not be affected by any of this! We are, as ever, at your service.)

Socially acceptable blankies

Socially acceptable blankies

My sister and I were talking last week about how it’s socially acceptable for kids these days to have a blanket or stuffed animal that they “self-comfort” with even up to early teenage years. The conversation made me think of Sara’s recent IG shawl pic, which she had hashtagged #sociallyacceptableblanket, and about those of us (grown-ups) who never leave home without a scarf or wrap of some kind. Living in the chilly Bay Area all those years, I never ever ever was without a big ol’ scarf. One in particular (the green paisley one pictured here, which somehow manages to go with everything) was always in my bag even if a different one was around my neck — it felt wrong to leave home without it. It accompanied me on countless trips over the course of a few years, including one to a small, very exclusive tech conference where I felt completely out of place and knew only two people, on top of which it was socially UNacceptable to be seen talking too long to anyone you already knew and verboten to sit next to them at a meal! We were there to meet new people — my worst skill. Throw in a really nasty cold, and I can tell you having that scarf around my neck that weekend veered past mere warmth or accessorizing and well into self-comfort territory. All of which got me thinking about how many blanket patterns I’ve saved up over the last few years with no intention of knitting them as blankets. That’s because every blanket that passes before my eyes (especially baby blankets) gets mentally resized into wrap proportions. I apparently only want a blanket if it can go everywhere with me. A few candidates from the top of my list:

TOP LEFT: Bairn by Julie Hoover

TOP RIGHT: Hambleton Throw by Martin Storey (free pattern)

MIDDLE LEFT: Umaro by Jared Flood (See also: Shale Baby Blanket)

MIDDLE RIGHT: Mosaic Blanket by the Purl Bee (free pattern)

BOTTOM LEFT: Chevron Baby Blanket by the Purl Bee (free pattern)

BOTTOM RIGHT: Ambrotype by Jocelyn Tunney (free pattern)

IN UNRELATED SHOP NEWS: The beloved folding rice baskets are back in stock in natural, as are the wooden gauge rulers. And we’ve also got a fresh batch of the loom kits. If you’ve been waiting, here’s your chance!

Crazy days of Summer

Crazy days of Summer

It is really crazy days around here right now, emotional rollercoaster days, with events both tragic and thrilling tossing me around. So today I’m taking a deep breath and hoping for one whole day of productivity. The most time-sensitive thing demanding my attention is the deadline (er, yesterday) for my pattern for the undisclosed item pictured above — which I did not knit, by the way. I wish I could tell you all about it, but I’ll be able to later this year! Assuming I actually finish it, that is … so off I go. Wish me luck!

Next of the Best of Resort 2016: a Sea of textiles

Next of the Best of Resort 2016: a Sea of textiles

Resort 2016 is officially the season of fringe and tassels and statement textiles — truly a fiber-lover’s dream season — and Sea is one of the best examples. Over the past few seasons, Sea has become one of my favorites (six months later, I’m still swooning over their Spring 2015 collection) but this Resort 2016 collection is everything. There are no knits to speak of, but there’s that amazing cable-y, braid-y textile used for the fringed top up top (as well as a kimono jacket), and another version of the same top in another stunning textile. There’s all the gorgeousness of that blown-up bandhani/bandana-ish print rendered in bleach on denim on an assortment of pieces, but most of all this dress. And there’s the dreamy long shirtdress with tiers of tassels, shown in ivory and olive. Plus all the denim and lace they’re known for. It’s the sort of collection that makes me want just about every piece in it, but also sets my brain buzzing with inspiration.

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PREVIOUSLY in Resort 2016: Tory Burch’s textiles

The day camp of my dreams

Kids' Fiber Camp

Sorry for the unexcused absence on Friday. If you follow me on Instagram, you know that my sister and niece (age 8) and nephew (10) were visiting all last week. Well, Thursday night I chose family time — a somewhat comical group attempt at sewing four double-sided napkins for them — over blogging. They were in town so Miss Nina could attend Fiber Camp at Craft South, taught by my friend Rebekka Seale, while my nephew attended robotics camp at Vanderbilt. I’m sure I’m not the only one who is terribly jealous that Nina got to spend a week of her summer doing this, so I asked her if she would like to write a guest blog post about it. She declined, saying writing isn’t her best thing. So we decided on a brief interview instead—

When your mom first told you about Fiber Camp, did you think you’d died and gone to heaven? Did you know what to expect?

Um, no. I had no idea what to expect, but it sounded fun.

Kids' Fiber Camp

Walk me through your week — what all did you do at camp?

The first day, we watched Rebekka spin and we dyed yarn with Kool-Aid. And then we went to the park to collect branches. At the end of the day, I got to spin on the spinning wheel.

Was it hard?

It was pretty easy. The next day I used the yarn that I spun for my branch weaving — you find sticks and you take your yarn and you weave on the stick.

But you did more than just weave on yours, correct?

I embroidered a tree and clouds onto it. And birds. The tree trunk is bark from a tree — I kind of weaved it in there with some of the yarn. And then we knitted with our yarn that we dyed. On the fourth day, we felted. We took a scrub brush and some felt pieces and used this little needle tool and we poked the felt into the sheet of felt and made pictures. And we made pompoms to hang off it — that yarn is so soft!

How much of that was new to you? Do you have an amazing aunt somewhere who had already introduced you to some of these pursuits?

[Giggling.] I have an aunt. [More giggling.] Felting and spinning were new — I had never heard of felting before. I’d seen spinning before but I never got to do it.

You also did a little bit of sewing with me, made a miniature black jacket with a colorful tulle brooch after seeing the Italian Style exhibit at the Frist Center, and visited the studios of several Nashville makers, including my friend Allison the amazing weaver. And then saw Caleb Groh’s incredible felted animals at the festival. It was a pretty crafty week — what did you like best of it all?

Felting. And Allison’s giant looms — that was pretty cool. I want to do it again.

Kids' Fiber Camp

Top photo courtesy of Rebekka Seale

New Favorites: Grille

New Favorites: Grille by Bonnie Sennott

As you likely heard, the ninth edition of Brooklyn Tweed’s Wool People hit the airwaves yesterday — a collection containing seven lace shawl patterns and seven sweater patterns. Were I a lace shawl person, I’d be casting on Loden ASAP. But I’m a sweater person, and the one here that makes my heart go pitty-pat is Grille by Bonnie Sennott. My love of the sweater vest is well-documented, as is my affinity for textural knit-purl patterns. So this oversized, sleeveless, crewneck number has my name written all over it.

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PREVIOUSLY in New Favorites: Fair-weather friends