Best new hat patterns

Best new hat patterns

There have been so many outstanding hat patterns published in the last few months, I thought it was time to highlight my favorites. I’m crazy about all of these:

1. Fractals Hat by Olga Buraya-Kefelian — striking geometry and a great crown

2. Hickory Cap by Veronik Avery — great pillbox shape, clever construction

3. Boyfriend Hat from the Purl Bee — a total classic (free pattern)

4. Magnolia beanie by Maria Socha — simple lace-stitch chart, fantastic crown (free pattern)

5. Wissahickon beanie by Meghan Kelly — top-down and all about the crown

6. Garter Ear Flap Hat by Purl Bee — sized for the whole family (free pattern)

7. Walsh head scarf by Julie Hoover — I want it as is and also at kerchief or shawl size

8. Lara’s Hat by Susan Ashcroft — previously mentioned, now available (free pattern)

9. Muckle Toque by Mary Jane Mucklestone — the hat version of her great Muckle Mitts

10. Quadrifurcus beanie by Rililie — great woven texture and shaped back/ribbing

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SHOP NOTE: So pleased to report that the sold-out buttons have been restocked!

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MORE GREAT HATS: A hat for every head / Beautifully textured hats / All star crowns

14 thoughts on “Best new hat patterns

  1. I love your new patterns posts – they’re always great for filling up my ‘to-knit’ list. I’m really looking forward to trying the new Purl Bee boyfriend hat – so simple and classic. The Hickory cap looks lovely – a lovely shape.

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  2. What a wonderful collection of hat patterns! I often find myself looking at the most popular hat patterns so it is always great to see new designs I would have otherwise missed!

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  3. I love hats. I am very busy making them at the moment (including an adorable baby one for my friend’s new baby) but I am noticing that double-pointed needles are sometimes needed. Should I be scared to try them out??

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    • No, don’t be scared! Hats are typically worked on a 16-inch circular until the crown decreases make the hat too small to stretch around the cable, at which point you’ll switch to DPNs. And that’s a nice initiation — better in some ways than starting fabric from scratch on the DPNs, which can be a little disorienting for some people.

      But it’s not nearly as scary or difficult as it looks. Just beware of your tension when you make the switch. If you’re nervous about it, you might well knit much more tightly on the DPs than you were on the circular.

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